The Validity of Connecting Conversations: A Narrative Method to Assess Experienced Quality of Care in Nursing Homes from the Resident's Perspective

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Abstract

It is important to assess experienced quality of care in nursing homes, as this portrays what is important to residents and helps identify what quality improvements should focus on. Connecting Conversations is a narrative method that assesses experienced quality of care from the resident's perspective in nursing homes by having separate conversations with residents, family, and professional caregivers (triads) within a learning network. This study assessed the validity of performing the narrative method, Connecting Conversations. Trained nursing home staff (interviewers) performed the conversations in another nursing home than where they were employed. In total, 149 conversations were performed in 10 nursing homes. Findings show that experts deemed the narrative assessment method appropriate and complete to assess experienced quality of care (face validity). The questions asked appeared to capture the full construct of experienced quality of care (content validity). Additionally, there was a range in how positive conversations were and first results indicated that a nursing home scoring higher on satisfaction had more positive conversations (construct validity). More data are needed to perform additional construct validity analyses. In conclusion, Connecting Conversations shows promising results for its use as a valid narrative method to assess experienced quality of care.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5100
Number of pages16
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Volume17
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2020

Keywords

  • narrative
  • quality assessment
  • validity
  • interviews
  • relationship-centered care
  • quality of care
  • triad
  • resident perspective
  • REPORTED OUTCOME MEASURES
  • CENTERED CARE
  • SATISFACTION
  • CHALLENGES
  • DEMENTIA
  • PEOPLE

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