The development of the dorsal mesentery in human embryos and fetuses

Jill P. J. M. Hikspoors, Nutmethee Kruepunga, Greet M. C. Mommen, Jean-Marie P. W. U. Peeters, Cindy J. M. Hulsman, S. Eleonore Kohler, Wouter H. Lamers*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journal(Systematic) Review article peer-review

8 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

The vertebrate intestine has a continuous dorsal mesentery between pharynx and anus that facilitates intestinal mobility. Based on width and fate the dorsal mesentery can be subdivided into that of the caudal foregut, midgut, and hindgut. The dorsal mesentery of stomach and duodenum is wide and topographically complex due to strong and asymmetric growth of the stomach. The associated formation of the lesser sac partitions the dorsal mesentery into the right-sided "caval fold" that serves as conduit for the inferior caval vein and the left-sided mesogastrium. The thin dorsal mesentery of the midgut originates between the base of the superior and inferior mesenteric arteries, and follows the transient increase in intestinal growth that results in small-intestinal looping, intestinal herniation and, subsequently, return. The following fixation of a large portion of the abdominal dorsal mesentery to the dorsal peritoneal wall by adhesion and fusion is only seen in primates and is often incomplete. Adhesion and fusion of mesothelial surfaces in the lesser pelvis results in the formation of the "mesorectum". Whether Toldt's and Denonvilliers' "fasciae of fusion" identify the location of the original mesothelial surfaces or, alternatively, represent the effects of postnatal wear and tear due to intestinal motility and intra-abdominal pressure changes, remains to be shown. "Malrotations" are characterized by growth defects of the intestinal loops with an ischemic origin and a narrow mesenteric root due to insufficient adhesion and fusion.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)18-26
Number of pages9
JournalSeminars in Cell & Developmental Biology
Volume92
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2019

Keywords

  • Mesogastrium
  • Caval fold
  • Lesser sac
  • Toldt's fascia
  • Denonvilliers' fascia
  • Slide-and-stack concept of intestinal return
  • (Mal-) rotation of gut
  • SHORT-BOWEL SYNDROME
  • INTESTINAL MALROTATION
  • RADIOGRAPHIC PATTERNS
  • REVERSED ROTATION
  • UMBILICAL-CORD
  • MIDGUT
  • GROWTH
  • SURGERY
  • STOMACH
  • REGION

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