The Cognitive Linkage and Divergence of Spelling and Reading Development

A.A. Vaessen, L.P.M. Blomert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

This study aimed to investigate to what extent reading and spelling share cognitive processes at different phases of literacy acquisition. The contributions of phonological awareness, letter-sound matching skills, and rapid naming (RAN) to spelling and reading were measured in a large sample with Dutch children (N=1,284) covering all primary school grades. The results indicated a different developmental pattern for spelling than for reading. At initial phases of literacy acquisition, phonological awareness and letter-sound matching skills contributed to both reading and spelling performance. However, in contrast to the declining influence of phonological awareness and letter-sound matching skills on fluent word reading (see also Vaessen & Blomert, 2010), the contributions of these skills to spelling performance were stable over the years, suggesting an ongoing reliance on orthography/phonology mappings during spelling. RAN did not contribute to spelling performance in any of the grades, in contrast to its strong contribution to reading performance, suggesting that RAN captures a cognitive skill that is unique for reading acquisition.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)89-107
Number of pages19
JournalScientific Studies of Reading
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2013

Keywords

  • PHONOLOGICAL AWARENESS
  • NAMING SPEED
  • WORD RECOGNITION
  • ACQUISITION
  • LITERACY
  • SKILLS
  • PREDICTORS
  • CHILDREN
  • FLUENCY
  • GRADES

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