Practice makes perfect: High performance gains in older adults engaged in selective attention within and across sensory modalities

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Selective attention has been found to decline with aging, possibly depending on the sensory modality through which targets and distractors are presented. We investigated the capacity of older adults to improve performance on visual and auditory selective attention tasks. 31 younger (mean age = 22.8 years, SD = 2.1) and 29 older participants (mean age = 69.5 years, SD = 5.8) performed visual and auditory tasks with and without unimodal and cross-modal distraction across five practice sessions. Reaction time decreased with practice in both age groups. Strikingly, this performance improvement was similar across the age groups. Moreover, distractor modality did not affect performance gains in either age group. Older adults were disproportionally affected by cross-modal visual distraction, however, corroborating previous studies. This age-related effect was mitigated during the practice sessions. Finally, there was no transfer of practice to neuropsychological test performance. These results suggest a high capacity of older individuals to improve selective attention functions within and across sensory modalities.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)101-111
Number of pages11
JournalActa Psychologica
Volume191
Early online date18 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 2018

Keywords

  • Aging
  • Selective attention
  • Distraction
  • Sensory modality
  • Practice
  • MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT
  • NORMATIVE DATA
  • AGE
  • DISTRACTION
  • INTERFERENCE
  • ENHANCEMENT
  • INTEGRATION
  • EDUCATION
  • DEMENTIA
  • SEX

Cite this

@article{539311a3f99049e684ea144ea278fc5f,
title = "Practice makes perfect: High performance gains in older adults engaged in selective attention within and across sensory modalities",
abstract = "Selective attention has been found to decline with aging, possibly depending on the sensory modality through which targets and distractors are presented. We investigated the capacity of older adults to improve performance on visual and auditory selective attention tasks. 31 younger (mean age = 22.8 years, SD = 2.1) and 29 older participants (mean age = 69.5 years, SD = 5.8) performed visual and auditory tasks with and without unimodal and cross-modal distraction across five practice sessions. Reaction time decreased with practice in both age groups. Strikingly, this performance improvement was similar across the age groups. Moreover, distractor modality did not affect performance gains in either age group. Older adults were disproportionally affected by cross-modal visual distraction, however, corroborating previous studies. This age-related effect was mitigated during the practice sessions. Finally, there was no transfer of practice to neuropsychological test performance. These results suggest a high capacity of older individuals to improve selective attention functions within and across sensory modalities.",
keywords = "Aging, Selective attention, Distraction, Sensory modality, Practice, MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT, NORMATIVE DATA, AGE, DISTRACTION, INTERFERENCE, ENHANCEMENT, INTEGRATION, EDUCATION, DEMENTIA, SEX",
author = "Franziska Rien{\"a}cker and Jacobs, {Heidi I.L.} and {Van Heugten}, {Caroline M} and {Van Gerven}, {Pascal W.M.}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2018",
month = "11",
doi = "10.1016/j.actpsy.2018.09.005",
language = "English",
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journal = "Acta Psychologica",
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T2 - High performance gains in older adults engaged in selective attention within and across sensory modalities

AU - Rienäcker, Franziska

AU - Jacobs, Heidi I.L.

AU - Van Heugten, Caroline M

AU - Van Gerven, Pascal W.M.

N1 - Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/11

Y1 - 2018/11

N2 - Selective attention has been found to decline with aging, possibly depending on the sensory modality through which targets and distractors are presented. We investigated the capacity of older adults to improve performance on visual and auditory selective attention tasks. 31 younger (mean age = 22.8 years, SD = 2.1) and 29 older participants (mean age = 69.5 years, SD = 5.8) performed visual and auditory tasks with and without unimodal and cross-modal distraction across five practice sessions. Reaction time decreased with practice in both age groups. Strikingly, this performance improvement was similar across the age groups. Moreover, distractor modality did not affect performance gains in either age group. Older adults were disproportionally affected by cross-modal visual distraction, however, corroborating previous studies. This age-related effect was mitigated during the practice sessions. Finally, there was no transfer of practice to neuropsychological test performance. These results suggest a high capacity of older individuals to improve selective attention functions within and across sensory modalities.

AB - Selective attention has been found to decline with aging, possibly depending on the sensory modality through which targets and distractors are presented. We investigated the capacity of older adults to improve performance on visual and auditory selective attention tasks. 31 younger (mean age = 22.8 years, SD = 2.1) and 29 older participants (mean age = 69.5 years, SD = 5.8) performed visual and auditory tasks with and without unimodal and cross-modal distraction across five practice sessions. Reaction time decreased with practice in both age groups. Strikingly, this performance improvement was similar across the age groups. Moreover, distractor modality did not affect performance gains in either age group. Older adults were disproportionally affected by cross-modal visual distraction, however, corroborating previous studies. This age-related effect was mitigated during the practice sessions. Finally, there was no transfer of practice to neuropsychological test performance. These results suggest a high capacity of older individuals to improve selective attention functions within and across sensory modalities.

KW - Aging

KW - Selective attention

KW - Distraction

KW - Sensory modality

KW - Practice

KW - MILD COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT

KW - NORMATIVE DATA

KW - AGE

KW - DISTRACTION

KW - INTERFERENCE

KW - ENHANCEMENT

KW - INTEGRATION

KW - EDUCATION

KW - DEMENTIA

KW - SEX

U2 - 10.1016/j.actpsy.2018.09.005

DO - 10.1016/j.actpsy.2018.09.005

M3 - Article

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JO - Acta Psychologica

JF - Acta Psychologica

SN - 0001-6918

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