Vitamin D effects on B cell function in autoimmunity

L. Rolf, A.H. Muris, R. Hupperts, J. Damoiseaux

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Vitamin D seems to be implicated in the pathophysiology of autoimmune disorders as a natural immune modulator. Beneficial effects of vitamin D have been associated with different cells of the immune system; however, thus far, B cells seem to be somewhat neglected. In this paper, we describe the possible direct effects of vitamin D on B cells, with a focus on antibody production and the more recently identified regulatory B (Breg ) cells. B cells upregulate the vitamin D receptor (VDR) upon activation. Furthermore, due to regulated expression of the metabolizing enzymes CYP27B1 and CYP24A1, B cells have the potential to control the local availability of active vitamin D. B cells, therefore, may participate in vitamin D-mediated immune homeostasis, including plasma cell generation. Whether or not other B cell subsets, such as Breg cells, are equally responsive to vitamin D remains to be established.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)84-91
Number of pages8
JournalAnnals of the New York Academy of Sciences
Volume1317
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2014

Keywords

  • vitamin D
  • B cell function
  • autoimmune diseases
  • regulatory B cell
  • interleukin-10
  • REGULATORY T-CELLS
  • MULTIPLE-SCLEROSIS
  • 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D-3
  • IMMUNOGLOBULIN PRODUCTION
  • IGE PRODUCTION
  • D DEFICIENCY
  • DISEASE
  • IL-10
  • DIFFERENTIATION
  • INHIBITION

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