Trust and the city: Linking urban upbringing to neural mechanisms of trust in psychosis

Imke L. J. Lemmers-Jansen*, Anne-Kathrin J. Fett, Jim van Os, Dick J. Veltman, Lydia Krabbendam

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

2 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Objective: Elevated prevalence of non-affective psychotic disorders is often found in densely populated areas. This functional magnetic resonance imaging study investigates if reduced trust, a component of impaired social functioning in patients with psychotic disorder, is associated with urban upbringing. Methods: In total, 39 patients (22 first episode and 17 clinical high risk) and 30 healthy controls, aged 16-29, performed two multi-round trust games, with a cooperative and unfair partner during functional magnetic resonance imaging scanning. Baseline trust was operationalized as the first investment made, and changes of trust as changes in investments made over the 20 trials during the games. Urban exposure during upbringing (0-15 years) was defined as higher urban (>= 2500 inhabitants/km(2)) or lower urban (

Original languageEnglish
Article number0004867419865939
Pages (from-to)138-149
Number of pages12
JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry
Volume54
Issue number2
Early online date14 Aug 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2020

Keywords

  • Psychotic disorder
  • urbanicity
  • trust
  • functional magnetic resonance imaging
  • amygdala
  • 1ST-EPISODE PSYCHOSIS
  • SOCIAL STRESS
  • AMYGDALA
  • SCHIZOPHRENIA
  • NEIGHBORHOOD
  • DISORDER
  • REWARD
  • ENVIRONMENT
  • RECIPROCITY
  • COGNITION

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