The multiple sclerosis susceptibility genes TAGAP and IL2RA are regulated by vitamin D in CD4+T cells

T. Berge*, I. S. Leikfoss, I. S. Brorson, S. D. Bos, C. M. Page, M. W. Gustavsen, A. Bjolgerud, T. Holmoy, E. G. Celius, J. Damoiseaux, J. Smolders, H. F. Harbo, A. Spurkland

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

25 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory, demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that develops in genetically susceptible individuals. The majority of the MS-associated gene variants are located in genetic regions with importance for T-cell differentiation. Vitamin D is a potent immunomodulator, and vitamin D deficiency has been suggested to be associated with increased MS disease susceptibility and activity. In CD4+ T cells, we have analyzed in vitro vitamin D responsiveness of genes that contain an MS-associated single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and with one or more vitamin D response elements in their regulatory regions. We identify IL2RA and TAGAP as novel vitamin D target genes. The vitamin D response is observed in samples from both MS patients and controls, and is not dependent on the genotype of MS-associated SNPs in the respective genes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)118-127
JournalGenes and Immunity
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2016

Cite this