The medial prefrontal cortex exhibits money illusion

Bernd Weber, Antonio Rangel, Matthias Wibral, Armin Falk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Behavioral economists have proposed that money illusion, which is a deviation from rationality in which individuals engage in nominal evaluation, can explain a wide range of important economic and social phenomena. This proposition stands in sharp contrast to the standard economic assumption of rationality that requires individuals to judge the value of money only on the basis of the bundle of goods that it can buy—its real value—and not on the basis of the actual amount of currency—its nominal value. We used fMRI to investigate whether the brain's reward circuitry exhibits money illusion. Subjects received prizes in 2 different experimental conditions that were identical in real economic terms, but differed in nominal terms. Thus, in the absence of money illusion there should be no differences in activation in reward-related brain areas. In contrast, we found that areas of the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC), which have been previously associated with the processing of anticipatory and experienced rewards, and the valuation of goods, exhibited money illusion. We also found that the amount of money illusion exhibited by the vmPFC was correlated with the amount of money illusion exhibited in the evaluation of economic transactions.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5025-5028
Number of pages4
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences USA
Volume106
Issue number13
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Mar 2009
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • neuroeconomics
  • Ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC)

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