The glycation level of milk protein strongly modulates post-prandial lysine availability in humans

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Abstract

Industrial heat treatment of milk results in protein glycation. A high protein glycation level has been suggested to compromise the post-prandial rise in plasma amino acid availability following protein ingestion. In the present study, we assessed the impact of glycation level of milk protein on post-prandial plasma amino acid responses in humans. Fifteen healthy, young men (age 26 (SEM 1) years, BMI 24 (SEM 1) kg/m(2)) participated in this randomised cross-over study and ingested milk protein powder with protein glycation levels of 3, 20 and 50 % blocked lysine. On each trial day, arterialised blood samples were collected at regular intervals during a 6-h post-prandial period to assess plasma amino acid concentrations using ultra-performance liquid chromatography. Plasma essential amino acid (EAA) concentrations increased following milk protein ingestion, with the 20 and 50 % glycated milk proteins showing lower overall EAA responses compared with the 3 % glycated milk protein (161 (SEM 7) and 142 (SEM 7) v. 178 (SEM 9) mmol/l x 6 h, respectively; P

Original languageEnglish
Article number0007114519002927
Pages (from-to)545-552
Number of pages8
JournalBritish Journal of Nutrition
Volume123
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Mar 2020

Keywords

  • Whey
  • Casein
  • Protein powder
  • Infant formula
  • Maillard reactions
  • MAILLARD REACTION-PRODUCTS
  • DIETARY-PROTEIN
  • NUTRITIONAL QUALITY
  • RESISTANCE EXERCISE
  • METABOLIC TRANSIT
  • SYNTHESIS RATES
  • WHEY-PROTEIN
  • MUSCLE
  • ABSORPTION
  • INGESTION

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