Science and Engineering Ph.D. Students' Career Outcomes, by Gender

Annamaria Conti*, Fabiana Visentin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

We examine differences in the careers of men and women Ph.D.s from two major European universities. Having performed regression analysis, we find that women are more likely than men to be employed in public administration when the alternatives are either academia or industry. Between the latter two alternatives, women are more likely to be employed in academia. These gender differences persist after accounting for Ph.D.s' and their supervisors' characteristics. Gender gaps are smaller for Ph.D.s with large research outputs and for those who conducted applied research. Restricting the analysis to Ph.D.s who pursued postdoc training, women are less likely than men to be employed in highly ranked universities, even after controlling for their research outputs.
Original languageEnglish
Article number0133177
Number of pages15
JournalPLOS ONE
Volume10
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Aug 2015
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • SELECTION BIAS
  • PRODUCTIVITY
  • ADVANCEMENT
  • SCIENTISTS

Cite this

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Science and Engineering Ph.D. Students' Career Outcomes, by Gender. / Conti, Annamaria; Visentin, Fabiana.

In: PLOS ONE, Vol. 10, No. 8, 0133177, 05.08.2015.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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KW - SCIENTISTS

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