Reduction in IBS symptom severity is not paralleled by improvement in quality of life in patients with irritable bowel syndrome

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Abstract

Background Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a brain-gut disorder, of which the natural course varies between patients and is difficult to predict. This study aimed to evaluate symptom evolution over a 5-year follow-up period and to identify baseline predictors for symptom severity and quality of life (QoL) at follow-up. Methods Maastricht IBS cohort participants completed questionnaires upon inclusion regarding demographics and lifestyle, gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms, anxiety and depression, and QoL. The same questionnaires, in addition to others, were completed after 5 years. Rome criteria were confirmed face-to-face at initial enrollment and through telephonic interviews at follow-up. Key Results At a mean follow-up of 4.7 years, 379 patients were approached of whom 203 (53.7%) responded. Of these, 161 were reached by telephone and analyzed; 49 (30.4%) did not fulfill the Rome III criteria at follow-up and had lower levels of GI symptoms and GI-specific anxiety compared to those remaining Rome III-positive (P <0.001). However, Rome III-negative patients had comparable levels of QoL and life satisfaction, comorbid anxiety and depression, work absenteeism, and impaired productivity. No baseline predictors were found for being Rome III-positive or Rome III-negative. However, greater age and lower baseline physical QoL predicted lower physical QoL at follow-up (P P <0.01, respectively), while lower baseline mental QoL predicted lower mental QoL at follow-up (P = 0.005). Additionally, higher anxiety and depression scores at follow-up were associated with lower QoL and life satisfaction at follow-up (P <0.001). Conclusions and Inferences Long-term QoL and general well-being might depend on concurrent psychological symptoms, rather than GI symptom improvement.

Original languageEnglish
Article number13629
Pages (from-to)1-10
Number of pages10
JournalNeurogastroenterology and Motility
Volume31
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2019

Keywords

  • irritable bowel syndrome
  • natural history
  • quality of life
  • Rome criteria
  • symptom evolution
  • PRODUCTIVITY COST QUESTIONNAIRE
  • GASTROINTESTINAL SYMPTOMS
  • HOSPITAL ANXIETY
  • VALIDATION
  • SCALE
  • SATISFACTION
  • COMMUNITY
  • VALIDITY
  • IMPACT
  • HABIT

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