Preserving Mobility in Older Adults with Physical Frailty and Sarcopenia: Opportunities, Challenges, and Recommendations for Physical Activity Interventions

Maxime Billot*, Riccardo Calvani, Annele Urtamo, Juan Luis Sanchez-Sanchez, Cecilia Ciccolari-Micaldi, Milan Chang, Regina Roller-Wirnsberger, Gerhard Wirnsberger, Alan Sinclair, Nieves Vaquero-Pinto, Satu Jyvakorpi, Hanna Ohman, Timo Strandberg, Jos M. G. A. Schols, Annemie M. W. J. Schols, Nick Smeets, Eva Topinkova, Helena Michalkova, Anna Rita Bonfigli, Fabrizia LattanzioLeocadio Rodriguez-Manas, Helio Coelho-Junior, Marianna Broccatelli, Maria Elena D'Elia, Damiano Biscotti, Emanuele Marzetti, Ellen Freiberger

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

29 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

One of the most widely conserved hallmarks of aging is a decline in functional capabilities. Mobility loss is particularly burdensome due to its association with negative health outcomes, loss of independence and disability, and the heavy impact on quality of life. Recently, a new condition, physical frailty and sarcopenia, has been proposed to define a critical stage in the disabling cascade. Physical frailty and sarcopenia are characterized by weakness, slowness, and reduced muscle mass, yet with preserved ability to move independently. One of the strategies that have shown some benefits in combatting mobility loss and its consequences for older adults is physical activity. Here, we describe the opportunities and challenges for the development of physical activity interventions in people with physical frailty and sarcopenia. The aim of this article is to review age-related physio(patho)logical changes that impact mobility in old age and to provide recommendations and procedures in accordance with the available literature.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1675-1690
Number of pages16
JournalClinical Interventions in Aging
Volume15
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • physical exercise
  • muscle mass
  • strength
  • walking
  • balance
  • better aging
  • SKELETAL-MUSCLE MASS
  • GAIT SPEED
  • BALANCE CONTROL
  • WALKING SPEED
  • PEOPLES PERSPECTIVES
  • COGNITIVE DECLINE
  • ELDERLY-PATIENTS
  • POSTURAL CONTROL
  • PROTEIN-INTAKE
  • NURSING-HOME

Cite this