Patient Acceptance of Invasive Treatments for Tinnitus

Jasper V. Smit*, Bart J. Pielkenrood, Remo A. G. J. Arts, Miranda L. Janssen, Yasin Temel, Robert J. Stokroos

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

5 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Purpose: The field of neuromodulation is currently seeking to treat a wide range of disorders with various types of invasive devices. In recent years, several preclinical trials and case reports in humans have been published on their potential for chronic tinnitus. However, studies to obtain insight into patients' willingness to undergo these treatments are scarce. The aim of this survey study was to find out whether tinnitus patients are willing to undergo invasive neuromodulation when taking its risks, costs, and potential benefits into account. Method: A Visual Analog Scale (VAS, 0-10) was used to measure the outcome. Spearman's rank-order correlation coefficients were computed to determine the correlation between patient characteristics and acceptance rates. Results: Around one fifth of the patients were reasonably willing to undergo invasive treatment (VAS 5-7), and around one fifth were fully willing to do so (VAS 8-10). Hearing aids, used as a control, were accepted most, followed by cochlear implantation, deep brain stimulation, and cortical stimulation. Acceptance rates were slightly higher when the chance of cure was higher. Patients with a history of attempted treatments were more eager than others to find a new treatment for tinnitus. Conclusions: A considerable proportion of patients with tinnitus would accept a variety of invasive treatments despite the associated risks or costs. When clinical neuromodulatory studies for tinnitus are to be performed, particular attention should be given to obtaining informed consent, including explaining the potential risks and providing a realistic outcome expectation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)184-196
Number of pages13
JournalAmerican Journal of Audiology
Volume27
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2018

Keywords

  • DEEP BRAIN-STIMULATION
  • ELECTRICAL-STIMULATION
  • PSYCHIATRIC-DISORDERS
  • CORTEX STIMULATION
  • RAPID ASSESSMENT
  • MINI-TQ
  • SUPPRESSION
  • MECHANISMS
  • SEVERITY
  • DISTRESS

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