New method to study oxidative damage and antioxidants in the human small bowel: effects of iron application

F.J.J. Troost, W.H.M. Saris, G.R.M.M. Haenen, A. Bast, R.J.M. Brummer

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Abstract

New method to study oxidative damage and antioxidants in the human small bowel: effects of iron application.

Troost FJ, Saris WH, Haenen GR, Bast A, Brummer RJ.

Dept. of Human Biology, Research Institute Maastricht, MaastrichtUniversity, The Netherlands. f.troost@hb.unimaas.nl

Iron may induce oxidative damage to the intestinal mucosa by its catalyzing role in the formation of highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. This study aimed to determine iron-induced oxidative damage provoked by a single clinical dosage of ferrous sulfate and to elucidate the antioxidant defense mechanisms in the human small intestine in vivo. A double-lumen perfusion tube was positioned orogastrically into a 40-cm segment of the proximal small intestine in six healthy volunteers (25 +/- 5 yr). The segment was perfused with saline and subsequently with saline containing 80 mg iron as ferrous sulfate at a rate of 10 ml/min. Intestinal fluid samples were collected at 15-min intervals. Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances concentrations as an indicator of lipid peroxidation increased significantly from 0.07 microM (range, 0-0.33 microM) during saline perfusion to 3.35 microM (range, 1.19-7.27 microM) during iron perfusion (P < 0.05). Nonprotein antioxidant capacity increased significantly from 474 microM (range, 162-748 microM) to 1,314 microM (range, 674-1,542 microM) (P < 0.05). These data show that a single dosage of ferrous sulfate induces oxidative damage and the subsequent release of an antioxidant in the small intestine in vivo in healthy volunteers.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)G354-G359
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology-Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Volume285
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2003

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