Moderate eating with pleasure and without effort: Toward understanding the underlying psychological mechanisms

Anton J. M. Dijker*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialAcademicpeer-review

4 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Integrating research on elementary eating behaviors, savoring, mental imagery, mindfulness, cooking, and dinner rituals, a psychological theory of moderate eating is formulated that does not require effortful self-control and giving up on the pleasures of eating. The theory proposes that taste and pleasure can be combined with a relatively objective attitude toward food, resulting in a relatively slow, gentle, and thoughtful manner of eating that enhances satiation. The objective food attitude is thought to result from (a) the accumulation of multiple sensorimotor expectancies and perspectives and (b) a motivational mechanism underlying prosocial behavior, food sharing, and aggression-inhibiting dinner rituals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-17
Number of pages17
JournalHealth Psychology Open
Volume6
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 21 Nov 2019

Keywords

  • authenticity
  • consciousness
  • cooking
  • dinner rituals
  • mindfulness
  • savoring
  • self-regulation
  • PORTION-SIZE
  • FOOD-INTAKE
  • SELF-REGULATION
  • COOKING
  • CONSUMPTION
  • COGNITION
  • INTERVENTIONS
  • PERCEPTION
  • SATIATION
  • OXYTOCIN

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