Maternal and child's vitamin D supplement use and vitamin D level in relation to childhood lung function: the KOALA Birth Cohort Study

E. Cremers, C. Thijs, J. Penders, E. Jansen, M. Mommers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background Vitamin D is associated with lung function in adults, but its relation with childhood lung function is still unclear.

Objective To investigate whether prenatal and postnatal vitamin D supplementation and plasma level is associated with childhood lung function.

Methods In the KOALA Birth Cohort Study, children's lung function (n=436) was measured at age 6-7 years by means of spirometry and presented as forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV(1)) z scores and forced vital capacity z scores. The mother and child's 25-hydroxyvitamin D plasma level was determined around 36 weeks of pregnancy and at age 2 years. Vitamin D supplement intake during pregnancy was defined based on the amount of vitamin D in supplements, and trimester and duration of use. Data on child's vitamin D supplement use were collected through questionnaires at ages 1, 2 and 6-7 years.

Results 25-Hydroxyvitamin D level and vitamin D supplement use in childhood were not associated with lung function. Maternal use of vitamin D at = 10 mu g/day and use in the first or all trimesters was not associated with significantly lower lung function levels.

Conclusion The authors found no association between 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels, vitamin D supplementation in childhood or recommended vitamin D dosage of >= 10 mu g/day during pregnancy and lung function in children aged 6-7 years.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)474-480
Number of pages7
JournalThorax
Volume66
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2011

Keywords

  • IMR-90 HUMAN FIBROBLASTS
  • 1,25-DIHYDROXYVITAMIN D-3
  • 5-YEAR-OLD CHILDREN
  • II CELLS
  • PREGNANCY
  • ASTHMA
  • FETAL
  • SPIROMETRY
  • ETIOLOGY
  • OUTCOMES

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