Long-Term Motor Deficits after Controlled Cortical Impact in Rats Can Be Detected by Fine Motor Skill Tests but Not by Automated Gait Analysis

Lisa-Maria Schonfeld, Ali Jahanshahi, Evi Lemmens, Sandra Schipper, Dearbhaile Dooley, Elbert Joosten, Yasin Temel, Sven Hendrix*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Animal models with constant, long-lasting motor deficits together with the right tests to assess behavioral abnormalities are needed to study the effectiveness of potential therapies to restore motor functions. In the current study, controlled cortical impact (CCI) was applied in rats to induce damage to the forelimb area of the motor cortex and the dorsal striatum. Motor behavior was assessed before and after CCI, using fine motor skill tests such as the adhesive removal test, the cylinder test, and the Montoya staircase test as well as the automated gait analysis system CatWalk XT over a 6 week period. CCI caused a variety of unilateral motor deficits, which were characterized in detail by using the selected fine motor skill tests. In striking contrast to previous studies on CCI in mice, neither forelimb impairments, nor general changes in gait, were detected with the CatWalk XT. These data suggest that the adhesive removal test, the cylinder test, and the Montoya staircase test are the methods of choice to detect long-term unilateral motor deficits in rats after CCI, whereas the use of automated gait analysis systems might not be suitable to measure these behavioral deviations.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)505-516
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Neurotrauma
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jan 2017

Keywords

  • adult brain injury
  • behavioral assessments
  • CCI
  • locomotor function
  • traumatic brain injury
  • TRAUMATIC BRAIN-INJURY
  • ELECTRICAL-STIMULATION
  • FUNCTIONAL RECOVERY
  • STAIRCASE TEST
  • CORTEX
  • SENSORIMOTOR
  • OUTCOMES
  • THERAPY
  • MODELS
  • STROKE

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