13 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Endometrial cancer (EC) is the most common malignancy of the female gynaecological tract and increased exposure to estrogens is a risk factor. EC cells are able to produce estrogens locally using precursors like, among others, adrenal steroids present in the serum. This is referred to as local estrogen metabolism (or intracrinology) and consists of a complex network of multiple enzymes. Particular relevant to the final generation of active estrogens in endometrial cells are: steroid sulfatase (STS), estrogen sulfotransferase (SULT1E1), aromatase (CYP19A1), 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD17B) type 1 and type 2. During the last decades, a plethora of studies explored the level of these enzymes in EC but contrasting data were reported, which generated vigorous debate and controversies. Several reviews attempted at clarifying some of the debated issues, but published reviews are based on investigator-defined bibliography selection and not on systematic analysis.

Therefore, we performed a systematic review of the literature reporting about the level of STS, SULT1E1, CYP19A1, HSD17B1 and HSD17B2 in EC. Additional intracrine enzymes and networks (e. g., HSD17Bs other than types 1 and 2, aldo-keto reductases, progesterone and androgen metabolism) were non-systematically reviewed as well.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)45-65
Number of pages21
JournalMolecular and Cellular Endocrinology
Volume489
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2019

Keywords

  • endometrial cancer
  • intracrinology
  • steroid sulfatase
  • estrogen sulfotransferase
  • 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 1
  • 17 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2
  • CYTOCHROME-P450 GENE-EXPRESSION
  • SULFATASE INHIBITOR IROSUSTAT
  • STEROID SULFATASE
  • AROMATASE EXPRESSION
  • PHASE-II
  • 17-BETA-HYDROXYSTEROID-DEHYDROGENASE TYPE-1
  • PROGESTERONE ACTION
  • ALTERED EXPRESSION
  • HUMAN BREAST
  • CARCINOMA

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