Intestinal function and metabolism in the early adaptive phase after massive small bowel resection in the rat

C.F.M. Welters, C.H.C. Dejong*, N.E.P. Deutz, E. Heineman

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Intestinal function and metabolism in the early adaptive phase after massive small bowel resection in the rat.

Welters CF, Dejong CH, Deutz NE, Heineman E.

Department of Surgery, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht University, Maastricht, The Netherlands.

PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate the early adaptive responses in metabolism and gut function after massive small bowel resection. METHODS: Male Wistar rats underwent an 80% small bowel resection (Ent group, n = 9) or a transection and reanastomozing (Sham group, n = 7). After 24 hours, substrate fluxes across the gut were determined together with intestinal protein synthesis, polyamine concentrations in gut tissue, and gut function by testing intestinal permeability using the urinary recovery of lactulose and rhamnose. To test for the effect of starvation, healthy starved rats were studied. RESULTS: In the Ent group, intestinal uptake of glucose, lactate, glutamine, phenylalanine, branched chain amino acids, and total amino acids were equal to or higher than that in Sham rats. Intestinal protein synthesis increased, accompanied by an increase in spermidine to spermine polyamine ratios in the ileum and in the jejunal muscular layer. The urinary lactulose to rhamnose ratio also increased, suggesting increased intestinal permeability. CONCLUSIONS: 24 hours after massive small bowel resection, adaptive responses in metabolism and gut function already can be observed, as indicated by increased intestinal uptake of substrates and increased protein synthesis. This, however, is accompanied by an increase in intestinal permeability, which may indicate impaired intestinal barrier function. J Pediatr Surg 36:1746-1751. Copyright 2001 by W.B. Saunders Company.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1746-1751
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Pediatric Surgery
Volume36
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2001

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