Individual differences impact memory for a crime: A study on executive functions resources

Fabiana Battista*, Henry Otgaar, Tiziana Lanciano, Antonietta Curci

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

6 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Previous studies demonstrated that memory accuracy is affected by the availability of the individual's cognitive resources. A predominant role in complex cognition has been postulated for executive functions (EF). The aim of the present study was to verify if there are differences in remembering a crime with respect to the individual's EF availability (i.e., Shifting, Inhibition, and Updating). We showed participants a video of a violent crime. Next, they were requested to imagine to be an eyewitness of the crime and report a testimony as detailed as possible. A subsequent memory test was run after ten days. EF resources were assessed in a third session through three neuropsychological tasks. Findings showed that high EF individuals reported more correct details and fewer memory distortions (i.e., omissions and commissions) than low EF individuals. Our results underline that individual EF resources are implicated in the recalling of an event.

Original languageEnglish
Article number103000
Number of pages13
JournalConsciousness and Cognition
Volume84
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2020

Keywords

  • CAPACITY
  • Executive functions
  • Eyewitness
  • FALSE MEMORIES
  • FRONTAL-LOBE
  • INFORMATION
  • Inhibition
  • MISINFORMATION
  • Memory errors
  • NEGATIVE AFFECT
  • PREDICTS
  • RECALL
  • SUSCEPTIBILITY
  • Shifting
  • Updating
  • WORKING-MEMORY

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