E. coli nitroreductase NfsA is a reporter gene for non-invasive PET imaging in cancer gene therapy applications

Alexandra Marie Mowday, Janine Naomi Copp, Sophie Philippa Syddall, Ludwig Jerome Dubois, Jingli Wang, Natasja Gabi Lieuwes, Rianne Biemans, Amir Ashoorzadeh, Maria Rosaria Abbattista, Elsie May Williams, Christopher Paul Guise, Philippe Lambin, David Francis Ackerley, Jeff Bruce Smaill, Jan Theys, Adam Vorn Patterson*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

9 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

The use of reporter genes to non-invasively image molecular processes inside cells has significant translational potential, particularly in the context of systemically administered gene therapy vectors and adoptively administered cells such as immune or stem cell based therapies. Bacterial nitroreductase enzymes possess ideal properties for reporter gene imaging applications, being of non-human origin and possessing the ability to metabolize a range of clinically relevant nitro(hetero)cyclic substrates.

Methods: A library of eleven Escherichia coli nitroreductase candidates were screened for the ability to efficiently metabolize 2-nitroimidazole based positron emission tomography (PET) probes originally developed as radiotracers for hypoxic cell imaging. Several complementary methods were utilized to detect formation of cell-entrapped metabolites, including various in vitro and in vivo models to establish the capacity of the 2-nitroimidazole PET agent EF5 to quantify expression of a nitroreductase candidate. Proof-of-principle PET imaging studies were successfully conducted using F-18-HX4.

Results: Recombinant enzyme kinetics, bacterial SOS reporter assays, anti-proliferative assays and flow cytometry approaches collectively identified the major oxygen-insensitive nitroreductase NfsA from E coli (NfsA_Ec) as the most promising nitroreductase reporter gene. Cells expressing NfsA_Ec were demonstrably labelled with the imaging agent EF5 in a manner that was quantitatively superior to hypoxia, in monolayers (2D), multicellular layers (3D), and in human tumor xenograft models. EF5 retention correlated with NfsA_Ec positive cell density over a range of EF5 concentrations in 3D in vitro models and in xenografts in vivo and was predictive of in vivo anti-tumor activity of the cytotoxic prodrug PR-104. Following PET imaging with F-18-HX4, a significantly higher tumor-to-blood ratio was observed in two xenograft models for NfsA_Ec expressing tumors compared to the parental tumors thereof, providing verification of this reporter gene imaging approach.

Conclusion: This study establishes that the bacterial nitroreductase NfsA_Ec can be utilized as an imaging capable reporter gene, with the ability to metabolize and trap 2-nitroimidazole PET imaging agents for non-invasive imaging of gene expression.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)10548-10562
Number of pages15
JournalTheranostics
Volume10
Issue number23
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Keywords

  • reporter gene imaging
  • PET imaging
  • nitroreductase
  • gene therapy
  • drug repurposing
  • POSITRON-EMISSION-TOMOGRAPHY
  • BIOREDUCTIVE PRODRUG PR-104A
  • PHASE-I
  • ANTITUMOR-ACTIVITY
  • TUMOR HYPOXIA
  • EXPRESSION
  • ACTIVATE
  • OXIDOREDUCTASE
  • BIOMARKER
  • ABLATION

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