Healthcare financing systems for increasing the use of tobacco dependence treatment

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background
Tobacco smoking is the leading preventable cause of death worldwide, which makes it essential to stimulate smoking cessation. The financial cost of smoking cessation treatment can act as a barrier to those seeking support. We hypothesised that provision of financial assistance for people trying to quit smoking, or reimbursement of their care provide r s, could lead to an increased rate of successful quit attempts. This is an update of the original 2005 review.
Objectives
The primary objective of this review was to assess the impact of reducing the costs for tobacco smokers or health care providers for using or providing smoking cessation treatment through healthcare financing interventions on abstinence from smoking. The secondary objectives were to examine the effects of different levels of financial support on the use or prescription of smoking cessation treatment, or both, and on the number of smoker s making a quit attempt (quitting smoking for at least 24 hours). We also assessed the cost
effectiveness of different financial interventions, and analysed the costs per additional quitter, or per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained.
Search methods
We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialised Register in September 2016.
Selection criteria
We considered randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled trials and interrupted time series studies involving financial benefit interventions to smokers or the ir healthcare providers, or both.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberCD004305
Pages (from-to)1-77
Number of pages79
JournalCochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Keywords

  • RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
  • PAY-FOR-PERFORMANCE
  • NICOTINE REPLACEMENT THERAPY
  • SMOKING-CESSATION SERVICES
  • INSURANCE-COVERAGE
  • COST-EFFECTIVENESS
  • ECONOMIC EVALUATIONS
  • CLINICAL-TRIAL
  • USE PREVENTION
  • INCENTIVES

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