Fornix deep brain stimulation induces reduction of hippocampal synaptophysin levels

Majed Aldehri, Yasin Temel, Ali Jahanshahi, Sarah Hescham*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Fornix deep brain stimulation (DBS) has the ability to refurbish memory functions in animal models with experimental dementia. One of the possible underlying mechanisms is the acute increase of acetylcholine in the hippocampus. Another suggested hypothesis is neuroplasticity. Recent work in rats has shown that acute fornix DBS can modulate neurotrophic factors as well as synaptic plasticity markers on the short-term. Here, we want to test the hypothesis that acute fornix DBS can also lead to long-term effects on neuroplasticity. Rats received DBS at 100 Hz, 100 mu A and 100 mu s pulse width for 4 h with electrodes placed bilaterally in the fornix. Seven weeks after stimulation, rats were sacrificed. BDNF, p-CREB, SV2 and synaptophysin immunohistochemistry was performed for their brains. No differences were found in the number of BDNF, p-CREB or SV2 positive cells for fornix DBS rats when compared to sham. Surprisingly, the density of synaptophysin immunoreactive presynaptic boutons was significantly decreased in the CA1 and CA3 subregion of the hippocampus for DBS rats. Therefore, fornix DBS might induce long-term depression related mechanisms.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-40
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Chemical Neuroanatomy
Volume96
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2019

Keywords

  • Deep brain stimulation
  • Fornix
  • Neuroplasticity
  • Synaptophysin
  • ELEMENT-BINDING PROTEIN
  • LOW-FREQUENCY STIMULATION
  • LONG-TERM DEPRESSION
  • MEMORY
  • CAMP
  • NEURONS
  • ACETYLCHOLINE
  • LOCALIZATION
  • MODULATION
  • SURVIVAL

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