Evidence That the Urban Environment Moderates the Level of Familial Clustering of Positive Psychotic Symptoms

Anton Grech, Jim van Os*, Genetic Risk and Outcome of Psychosis (GROUP) Investigators

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

7 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

If the shared familial risk factors that predispose to psychotic disorder interact with early-life exposures in the urban environment, familial correlations of psychosis proneness measures should be higher in the exposed environment. We tested the hypothesis that in sib-pairs with one member affected by psychotic disorder, the familial correlation of psychotic experiences, but not depression, negative symptoms, or intelligence quotient (IQ), would be higher if the nonaffected sibling was raised in an urban environment until age 15 years. The sample analyzed consisted of 959 sib-pairs of whom one was affected with psychotic disorder. Lifetime self-reported psychotic and depressive experiences were measured using the self-reported "Community Assessment of Psychic Experiences" (CAPE). In the unadjusted model of the sibling-patient association in CAPE positive symptoms, there was a significant interaction by urban environment (B interaction = 0.079, 95% CI: 0.021 to 0.137, P =.007, n = 828). Stratified analyses revealed a strong sib-pair association in the urban environment (B = 0.077, 95% CI: 0.037 to 0.117, P

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)325-331
Number of pages7
JournalSchizophrenia Bulletin
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2017

Keywords

  • schizophrenia
  • etiology
  • genes
  • urbanicity
  • risk factors
  • SCHIZOPHRENIA RISK
  • NEGATIVE SYMPTOMS
  • EXPERIENCES
  • LIABILITY
  • RELIABILITY
  • POPULATION
  • INSTRUMENT

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