Development of a computer-tailored physical activity intervention for prostate and colorectal cancer patients and survivors: OncoActive

R. H. J. Golsteijn*, C. Bolman, E. Volders, D. A. Peels, H. de Vries, L. Lechner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

15 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Background: Cancer and cancer treatment coincide with substantial negative physical, psychological and psychosocial problems. Physical activity (PA) can positively affect the negative effects of cancer and cancer treatment and thereby increase quality of life in CPS. Nevertheless, only a minority of CPS meet PA guidelines. We developed the OncoActive (OncoActief in Dutch) intervention: a computer-tailored PA program to stimulate PA in prostate and colorectal CPS, because to our knowledge there are only a few PA interventions for these specific cancer types in the Netherlands

Methods: The OncoActive intervention was developed through systematic adaptation of a proven effective, evidence-based, computer-tailored PA intervention for adults over fifty, called Active Plus. The Intervention Mapping (IM) protocol was used to guide the systematic adaptation. A literature study and interviews with prostate and colorectal CPS and health care professionals revealed that both general and cancer-specific PA determinants are important and should be addressed. Change objectives, theoretical methods and applications and the actual program content were adapted to address the specific needs, beliefs and cancer-related issues of prostate and colorectal CPS. Intervention participants received tailored PA advice three times, on internet and with printed materials, and a pedometer to set goals to improve PA. Pre- and pilot tests showed that the intervention was highly appreciated (target group) and regarded safe and feasible (healthcare professionals). The effectiveness of the intervention is being evaluated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) (n = 428), consisting of an intervention group and a usual care waiting-list control group, with follow-up measurements at three, six and twelve months. Participants are recruited from seventeen hospitals and with posters, flyers and calls in several media.

Discussion: Using the Intervention Mapping protocol resulted in a systematically adapted, theory and evidence-based intervention providing tailored PA advice to prostate and colorectal CPS. If the intervention turns out to be effective in increasing PA, as evaluated in a RCT, possibilities for nationwide implementation and extension to other cancer types will be explored.

Original languageEnglish
Article number446
Number of pages19
JournalBMC Cancer
Volume17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Jun 2017

Keywords

  • Prostate cancer
  • Colorectal cancer
  • Physical activity
  • eHealth
  • Computer tailoring
  • Intervention mapping
  • Cancer survivorship
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIAL
  • BEHAVIOR-CHANGE INTERVENTIONS
  • TERM FUNCTIONAL OUTCOMES
  • POPULATION-BASED SAMPLE
  • 6 MONTHS POSTTREATMENT
  • BREAST-CANCER
  • ACTIVITY GUIDELINES
  • HEALTH BEHAVIORS
  • ACTIVITY PARTICIPATION

Cite this