Current Challenges in the Diagnosis and Management of Selective Mutism in Children

Peter Muris*, Thomas H Ollendick

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalReview articlepeer-review

7 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Selective mutism (SM) is a childhood disorder characterized by a consistent failure to speak in specific social situations (eg, school) despite speaking normally in other settings (eg, at home). This article summarizes evidence supporting the recent classification of SM as an anxiety disorder and discusses the implications of this re-classification for the assessment and treatment of SM in clinical practice. Meanwhile, clinicians should also realize that SM sometimes is a heterogeneous disorder in which other problems are also present that complicate the management of children with SM. As examples, we discuss speech and language problems, developmental delay, and autism spectrum disorders.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-167
Number of pages9
JournalPsychology Research and Behavior Management
Volume14
Issue number14
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 16 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • selective mutism
  • anxiety disorder
  • assessment
  • treatment
  • COGNITIVE-BEHAVIORAL THERAPY
  • SOCIAL ANXIETY DISORDER
  • AUTISM SPECTRUM DISORDERS
  • INTERVENTION
  • SILENCE
  • RISK
  • COMBINATION
  • INHIBITION
  • PREVENTION
  • LANGUAGE

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