Correlates of perceived HIV-related stigma among HIV-positive pregnant women in rural Mpumalanga province, South Africa

Shandir Ramlagan*, Sibusiso Sifunda, Karl Peltzer, Jenny Jean, Robert A. C. Ruiter

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

The study investigated correlates of perceived HIV-related stigma among 673 HIV-positive women from rural Mpumalanga province, South Africa (mean age 28 years old, SD = 5.73 years). The women completed measures of HIV-related stigma experience and related personal factors. Following multivariable logistic regression, results showed that lack of male involvement during the ante-natal visits was significantly associated with all four perceived HIV-related stigma factors. Lower income, intimate partner violence (IPV), lower education, and experienced HIV-related stigma were associated with a combination of the four components of perceived HIV-related stigma. From these findings, we conclude that higher levels of education, income, and partner involvement are protective factors against perceived HIV-related stigma, at multiple layers. Improving on adult education and income generating activities can help in reducing HIV-related stigma. Male partner involvement in their partner's pregnancy, the initiation of support groups for both women and men, as well as community-based IPV prevention interventions may help to reduce perceived HIV-related stigma among women living with HIV.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)141-148
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Psychology in Africa
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • HIV
  • negative self-image
  • pregnant
  • stigma
  • women
  • TO-CHILD TRANSMISSION
  • INTERNALIZED STIGMA
  • POSTNATAL DEPRESSION
  • HIV/AIDS
  • EXPERIENCES
  • DISCLOSURE
  • PREVENTION
  • PEOPLE
  • GENDER
  • DISCRIMINATION

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