Conscientious objection to deceased organ donation by healthcare professionals

David Shaw, Dale Gardiner, Penney Lewis, Nichon Jansen, Tineke Wind, Undine Samuel, Denie Georgieva, Rutger Ploeg, Andrew Broderick

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Abstract

In this article, we analyse the potential benefits and disadvantages of permitting healthcare professionals to invoke conscientious objection to deceased organ donation. There is some evidence that permitting doctors and nurses to register objections can ultimately lead to attitudinal change and acceptance of organ donation. However, while there may be grounds for conscientious objection in other cases such as abortion and euthanasia, the life-saving nature of donation and transplantation renders objection in this context more difficult to justify. In general, dialogue between healthcare professionals is a more appropriate solution, and any objections must be justified with a strong rationale in hospitals where such policies are put in place.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)43-47
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the Intensive Care Society
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2018

Cite this

Shaw, D., Gardiner, D., Lewis, P., Jansen, N., Wind, T., Samuel, U., Georgieva, D., Ploeg, R., & Broderick, A. (2018). Conscientious objection to deceased organ donation by healthcare professionals. Journal of the Intensive Care Society, 19(1), 43-47. https://doi.org/10.1177/1751143717731230