Civil disobedience in scientific authorship: Resistance and insubordination in science

Bart Penders*, David M Shaw

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

6 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

The distribution of credit, resources and opportunities in science is heavily skewed due to unjust practices and incentives, hardwired into science's rules, guidelines and conventions. A form of resistance widely available is to break those rules. We review instances of rule-breaking in scientific authorship to allow for a redefinition of the concept of civil disobedience in the context of academic research, as well as the conditions on which the label applies. We show that, in contrast to whistleblowing or conscientious objection, civil disobedience targets science's injustice on a more systemic level. Its further development will ease critical evaluation of deviant actions as well as helping us evaluate deviance, defiance and discontent in science beyond issues of authorship. However, empirically, civil disobedience in science engenders uncertainties and disagreements on the local status of both act and label.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)347-371
Number of pages25
JournalAccountability in Research-Policies and Quality Assurance
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • CO-AUTHORSHIP
  • COLLABORATION
  • CREDIT
  • Civil disobedience
  • DIVERSITY
  • DYNAMICS
  • GAME
  • HONORARY AUTHORSHIP
  • MANIFESTO
  • PUBLICATIONS
  • authorship
  • protest
  • research governance
  • research integrity
  • resistance

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