Anterior Temporal Lobectomy Impairs Neural Classification of Body Emotions in Right Superior Temporal Sulcus and Reduces Emotional Enhancement in Distributed Brain Areas without Affecting Behavioral Classification

Laura Van de Vliet, Jan Jastorff, Yun-An Huang, Wim Van Paesschen, Mathieu Vandenbulcke, Jan Van den Stock*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

10 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

Humans with amygdalar lesions show proportional reductions of the emotional response to facial expressions in the fusiform face area as well as deficits in emotion recognition from facial expressions. While processing of bodily expressions shares many similarities with facial expressions, there is no substantial evidence that lesions of the amygdala result in similar behavioral and neural sequelae. We combined behavioral assessment with functional neuroimaging in a group of male and female humans with unilateral anterior temporal lobe (ATL) resections, including the amygdala (right: n = 10; left: n = 10) and 12 matched controls. The objective was to assess whether the amygdala is crucial for the recognition of body expressions and for modulatory effects on distant areas during perception of body expressions. The behavioral results revealed normal performance in both patient groups on emotion categorization of body expressions. The neuroimaging results showed that ATL patients displayed no enhanced activations in right fusiform body area and left extrastriate body area and that left ATL patients additionally displayed no enhanced activations in right posterior superior temporal sulcus and right extrastriate body area, respectively. Multivoxel pattern analysis revealed altered categorization capacity between emotional and neutral stimuli in right posterior superior temporal sulcus in right ATL patients. In addition, we also found emotional enhancement in frontal, parietal, occipital, and cingulate regions in controls. Together, our data show that the amygdala and ATLs are not necessary for recognition of dynamic body expressions, but suggest that amygdala lesions affect body emotion processing in distant brain areas.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9263-9274
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Neuroscience
Volume38
Issue number43
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Oct 2018

Keywords

  • amygdala
  • body
  • connectivity
  • emotion
  • lobectomy
  • MVPA
  • BILATERAL AMYGDALA DAMAGE
  • FACE-RESPONSIVE REGIONS
  • FRONTOTEMPORAL DEMENTIA
  • FACIAL EXPRESSIONS
  • FUNCTIONAL CONNECTIVITY
  • FUSIFORM GYRUS
  • WHOLE-BODY
  • RECOGNITION
  • PERCEPTION
  • FEAR

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