Aggressive Behavior, Hostility, and Associated Care Needs in Patients With Psychotic Disorders: A 6-Year Follow-Up Study

Margo D. M. Faay*, Jim van Os, Therese van Amelsvoort, Agna A. Bartels-Velthuis, Richard Bruggeman, Wiepke Cahn, Lieuwe de Haan, Frederike Schirmbeck, Claudia J. P. Simons, Genetic Risk and Outcome of Psychosis (GROUP) Investigators

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Abstract

Background: Hostility and aggressive behavior in patients with psychotic disorders are associated with demographic and clinical risk factors, as well as with childhood adversity and neglect. Care needs are an essential concept in clinical practice; care needs in the domain of safety for others reflect the actual problem the patient has. Hostility, aggressive behavior, and associated care needs, however, are often studied in retrospect. Method: In a sample of 1,119 patients with non-affective psychotic disorders, who were interviewed three times over a period of 6 years, we calculated the incidence of hostility, self-reported maltreatment to others and care needs associated with safety for other people (safety-to-others). Regression analysis was used to analyze the association between these outcomes and risk factors. The population attributable fraction (PAF) was used to calculate the proportion of the outcome that could potentially be prevented if previous expressions of adverse behavior were eliminated. Results: The yearly incidence of hostility was 2.8%, for safety-to-others 0.8% and for maltreatment this was 1.8%. Safety-to-others was associated with previous hostility and vice versa, but, assuming causality, only 18% of the safety-to-others needs was attributable to previous hostility while 26% was attributable to impulsivity. Hostility, maltreatment and safety-to-others were all associated with number of unmet needs, suicidal ideation and male sex. Hostility and maltreatment, but not safety-to-others, were associated with childhood adversity. Neither safety-to-others, maltreatment nor hostility were associated with premorbid adjustment problems. Conclusion: The incidence of hostility, self-reported aggressive behaviors, and associated care needs is low and linked to childhood adversity. Known risk factors for prevalence also apply to incidence and for care needs associated with safety for other people. Clinical symptoms can index aggressive behaviors years later, providing clinicians with some opportunity for preventing future incidents.

Original languageEnglish
Article number934
Number of pages12
JournalFrontiers in Psychiatry
Volume10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • aggression
  • violence
  • needs assessment
  • psychotic disorders
  • incidence
  • risk factors
  • INTERVENTION EFFECTIVENESS CATIE
  • CLINICAL ANTIPSYCHOTIC TRIALS
  • VIOLENT BEHAVIOR
  • CHILDHOOD TRAUMA
  • PREMORBID ADJUSTMENT
  • SCHIZOPHRENIA
  • RELIABILITY
  • VALIDITY
  • PEOPLE
  • INSTRUMENT

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