Acute stress enhances memory for emotional words, but impairs memory for neutral words.

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Abstract

This article examined effects of acute stress on memory for neutral and emotional words. participants (n=40) were exposed to either a psychosocial stressor or a control task, followed by a memory test. The stress hormone cortisol was measured in saliva before and after stress induction and after the memory test. Acute stress had a differential effect all memory such that recall of neutral words was impaired, whereas that of emotional words was enhanced. These effects on memory performance were not mediated by cortisol. The authors conclude that it makes little sense to speculate about memory effects and elevated levels of cortisol because such effects might depend on the valence of the material that is learned.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1343-1351
JournalInternational Journal of Neuroscience
Volume114
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2004

Cite this

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title = "Acute stress enhances memory for emotional words, but impairs memory for neutral words.",
abstract = "This article examined effects of acute stress on memory for neutral and emotional words. participants (n=40) were exposed to either a psychosocial stressor or a control task, followed by a memory test. The stress hormone cortisol was measured in saliva before and after stress induction and after the memory test. Acute stress had a differential effect all memory such that recall of neutral words was impaired, whereas that of emotional words was enhanced. These effects on memory performance were not mediated by cortisol. The authors conclude that it makes little sense to speculate about memory effects and elevated levels of cortisol because such effects might depend on the valence of the material that is learned.",
author = "M. Jelicic and E.G. Geraerts and H.L.G.J. Merckelbach and R. Guerrieri",
year = "2004",
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language = "English",
volume = "114",
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journal = "International Journal of Neuroscience",
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Acute stress enhances memory for emotional words, but impairs memory for neutral words. / Jelicic, M.; Geraerts, E.G.; Merckelbach, H.L.G.J.; Guerrieri, R.

In: International Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 114, 01.01.2004, p. 1343-1351.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acute stress enhances memory for emotional words, but impairs memory for neutral words.

AU - Jelicic, M.

AU - Geraerts, E.G.

AU - Merckelbach, H.L.G.J.

AU - Guerrieri, R.

PY - 2004/1/1

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N2 - This article examined effects of acute stress on memory for neutral and emotional words. participants (n=40) were exposed to either a psychosocial stressor or a control task, followed by a memory test. The stress hormone cortisol was measured in saliva before and after stress induction and after the memory test. Acute stress had a differential effect all memory such that recall of neutral words was impaired, whereas that of emotional words was enhanced. These effects on memory performance were not mediated by cortisol. The authors conclude that it makes little sense to speculate about memory effects and elevated levels of cortisol because such effects might depend on the valence of the material that is learned.

AB - This article examined effects of acute stress on memory for neutral and emotional words. participants (n=40) were exposed to either a psychosocial stressor or a control task, followed by a memory test. The stress hormone cortisol was measured in saliva before and after stress induction and after the memory test. Acute stress had a differential effect all memory such that recall of neutral words was impaired, whereas that of emotional words was enhanced. These effects on memory performance were not mediated by cortisol. The authors conclude that it makes little sense to speculate about memory effects and elevated levels of cortisol because such effects might depend on the valence of the material that is learned.

U2 - 10.1080/00207450490476101

DO - 10.1080/00207450490476101

M3 - Article

VL - 114

SP - 1343

EP - 1351

JO - International Journal of Neuroscience

JF - International Journal of Neuroscience

SN - 0020-7454

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