Acceptance of Home-Based Chlamydia Genital and Anorectal Testing Using Short Message Service (SMS) in Previously Tested Young People and Their Social and Sexual Networks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background

Control strategies for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) are most effective when targeting people at highest risk. We assessed test acceptance of home-collection test kits offered by short messaging services (SMS) texts, in high-risk young people, i.e. those who had previously tested CT positive (positive indices), or negative reporting more than 3 sex partners (negative indices), and their sexual and social networks.

Methods

Young (16 to 25 years old) heterosexuals who previously tested positive (n=536) or negative (n=536) in our STI clinic received, 3 to 20 months after their initial screening, an SMS inviting them to re-test. They were offered a free home-collection test kit including a genital (men and women) and anorectal (women only) test, and a test kit to pass on to a friend or sex partner (peer). SMS reminders were sent in case of non-response. We assessed proportions of tests requested and returned, peers tested, and positivity. Associations with the individual's initial screening result and other factors were explored using logistic regression.

Results

Of 1072 people invited to retest, 34.4% (n=369) requested a test. Of these, 55.8% (n=206) retested. Overall, retest participation was higher in positive (22%) than in negative indices (16%) (p22 years. Positivity was 13% and 7% in positive and negative indices, respectively. One in 3 retesters also had a peer tested. Of tested peers (n=87), 84% were friends, 31% were first-time testers, and 7% tested positive.

Conclusion

Acceptance of a relatively low-cost strategy for genital and anorectal testing, i.e. using SMS and home-collection test kits, was highest in individuals who previously tested CT positive suggesting that implementation for this group may be considered. By further including a peer-led testing component, undetected CT positives can be identified in the social networks surrounding a high-risk individual.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0133575
Number of pages15
JournalPLOS ONE
Volume10
Issue number7
Early online date31 Jul 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jul 2015

Keywords

  • TAKEN VAGINAL SWABS
  • OF-THE-LITERATURE
  • NEISSERIA-GONORRHOEAE
  • TRANSMITTED-DISEASES
  • UROGENITAL CHLAMYDIA
  • SCREENING-PROGRAM
  • TRACHOMATIS
  • WOMEN
  • ACCEPTABILITY
  • RISK

Cite this

@article{267731fc6d3f412b83a5f7052a2ce6bb,
title = "Acceptance of Home-Based Chlamydia Genital and Anorectal Testing Using Short Message Service (SMS) in Previously Tested Young People and Their Social and Sexual Networks",
abstract = "BackgroundControl strategies for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) are most effective when targeting people at highest risk. We assessed test acceptance of home-collection test kits offered by short messaging services (SMS) texts, in high-risk young people, i.e. those who had previously tested CT positive (positive indices), or negative reporting more than 3 sex partners (negative indices), and their sexual and social networks.MethodsYoung (16 to 25 years old) heterosexuals who previously tested positive (n=536) or negative (n=536) in our STI clinic received, 3 to 20 months after their initial screening, an SMS inviting them to re-test. They were offered a free home-collection test kit including a genital (men and women) and anorectal (women only) test, and a test kit to pass on to a friend or sex partner (peer). SMS reminders were sent in case of non-response. We assessed proportions of tests requested and returned, peers tested, and positivity. Associations with the individual's initial screening result and other factors were explored using logistic regression.ResultsOf 1072 people invited to retest, 34.4{\%} (n=369) requested a test. Of these, 55.8{\%} (n=206) retested. Overall, retest participation was higher in positive (22{\%}) than in negative indices (16{\%}) (p22 years. Positivity was 13{\%} and 7{\%} in positive and negative indices, respectively. One in 3 retesters also had a peer tested. Of tested peers (n=87), 84{\%} were friends, 31{\%} were first-time testers, and 7{\%} tested positive.ConclusionAcceptance of a relatively low-cost strategy for genital and anorectal testing, i.e. using SMS and home-collection test kits, was highest in individuals who previously tested CT positive suggesting that implementation for this group may be considered. By further including a peer-led testing component, undetected CT positives can be identified in the social networks surrounding a high-risk individual.",
keywords = "TAKEN VAGINAL SWABS, OF-THE-LITERATURE, NEISSERIA-GONORRHOEAE, TRANSMITTED-DISEASES, UROGENITAL CHLAMYDIA, SCREENING-PROGRAM, TRACHOMATIS, WOMEN, ACCEPTABILITY, RISK",
author = "N.H.T.M. Dukers-Muijrers and K.A.T.M. Theunissen and P.T. Wolffs and G. Kok and C.J.P.A. Hoebe",
year = "2015",
month = "7",
day = "31",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0133575",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
journal = "PLOS ONE",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acceptance of Home-Based Chlamydia Genital and Anorectal Testing Using Short Message Service (SMS) in Previously Tested Young People and Their Social and Sexual Networks

AU - Dukers-Muijrers, N.H.T.M.

AU - Theunissen, K.A.T.M.

AU - Wolffs, P.T.

AU - Kok, G.

AU - Hoebe, C.J.P.A.

PY - 2015/7/31

Y1 - 2015/7/31

N2 - BackgroundControl strategies for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) are most effective when targeting people at highest risk. We assessed test acceptance of home-collection test kits offered by short messaging services (SMS) texts, in high-risk young people, i.e. those who had previously tested CT positive (positive indices), or negative reporting more than 3 sex partners (negative indices), and their sexual and social networks.MethodsYoung (16 to 25 years old) heterosexuals who previously tested positive (n=536) or negative (n=536) in our STI clinic received, 3 to 20 months after their initial screening, an SMS inviting them to re-test. They were offered a free home-collection test kit including a genital (men and women) and anorectal (women only) test, and a test kit to pass on to a friend or sex partner (peer). SMS reminders were sent in case of non-response. We assessed proportions of tests requested and returned, peers tested, and positivity. Associations with the individual's initial screening result and other factors were explored using logistic regression.ResultsOf 1072 people invited to retest, 34.4% (n=369) requested a test. Of these, 55.8% (n=206) retested. Overall, retest participation was higher in positive (22%) than in negative indices (16%) (p22 years. Positivity was 13% and 7% in positive and negative indices, respectively. One in 3 retesters also had a peer tested. Of tested peers (n=87), 84% were friends, 31% were first-time testers, and 7% tested positive.ConclusionAcceptance of a relatively low-cost strategy for genital and anorectal testing, i.e. using SMS and home-collection test kits, was highest in individuals who previously tested CT positive suggesting that implementation for this group may be considered. By further including a peer-led testing component, undetected CT positives can be identified in the social networks surrounding a high-risk individual.

AB - BackgroundControl strategies for Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) are most effective when targeting people at highest risk. We assessed test acceptance of home-collection test kits offered by short messaging services (SMS) texts, in high-risk young people, i.e. those who had previously tested CT positive (positive indices), or negative reporting more than 3 sex partners (negative indices), and their sexual and social networks.MethodsYoung (16 to 25 years old) heterosexuals who previously tested positive (n=536) or negative (n=536) in our STI clinic received, 3 to 20 months after their initial screening, an SMS inviting them to re-test. They were offered a free home-collection test kit including a genital (men and women) and anorectal (women only) test, and a test kit to pass on to a friend or sex partner (peer). SMS reminders were sent in case of non-response. We assessed proportions of tests requested and returned, peers tested, and positivity. Associations with the individual's initial screening result and other factors were explored using logistic regression.ResultsOf 1072 people invited to retest, 34.4% (n=369) requested a test. Of these, 55.8% (n=206) retested. Overall, retest participation was higher in positive (22%) than in negative indices (16%) (p22 years. Positivity was 13% and 7% in positive and negative indices, respectively. One in 3 retesters also had a peer tested. Of tested peers (n=87), 84% were friends, 31% were first-time testers, and 7% tested positive.ConclusionAcceptance of a relatively low-cost strategy for genital and anorectal testing, i.e. using SMS and home-collection test kits, was highest in individuals who previously tested CT positive suggesting that implementation for this group may be considered. By further including a peer-led testing component, undetected CT positives can be identified in the social networks surrounding a high-risk individual.

KW - TAKEN VAGINAL SWABS

KW - OF-THE-LITERATURE

KW - NEISSERIA-GONORRHOEAE

KW - TRANSMITTED-DISEASES

KW - UROGENITAL CHLAMYDIA

KW - SCREENING-PROGRAM

KW - TRACHOMATIS

KW - WOMEN

KW - ACCEPTABILITY

KW - RISK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0133575

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0133575

M3 - Article

VL - 10

JO - PLOS ONE

JF - PLOS ONE

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 7

M1 - e0133575

ER -