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Sexual Arousal and Implicit and Explicit Determinants of Condom Use Intentions

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Abstract

Being sexually aroused may be an important risk factor contributing to sexual decision making. Dual-process cognitive models, such as the reflective-impulsive model of Strack and Deutsch (2004), could be used to explain the effect of sexual arousal on intentions to use a condom. In this study, we investigated whether explicit and implicit attitudes toward condom use can predict intentions to use a condom when participants are sexually aroused and not aroused. In a within-subjects experimental design, male participants (N = 27) watched both a neutral and an erotic movie clip in counterbalanced order. After each clip, participants completed a questionnaire assessing their intentions to use a condom and explicit condom attitudes, followed by a wanting Implicit Association Test (IAT; Greenwald et al., 2003) and a liking IAT to assess their implicit attitudes to unsafe sex. In concordance with the reflective-impulsive model, we found that when participants were not sexually aroused, their intentions to use a condom were solely predicted by their explicit attitudes. However, when they were sexually aroused, intentions to use a condom were predicted by both explicit and implicit attitudes toward condom use.

    Research areas

  • Sexual risk, Sexual arousal, Attitudes, Implicit Association Test, Dual-process model, INCREASING NEUTRAL DISTRACTION, ALCOHOL-INTOXICATION, ASSOCIATION TEST, RISK-TAKING, BEHAVIORAL SKILLS, DECISION-MAKING, ATTITUDES, IMPACT, METAANALYSIS, PERCEPTION
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Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)469-480
Number of pages12
JournalArchives of Sexual Behavior
Volume48
Issue number2
Early online date12 Jul 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2019