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Maltreatment increases spontaneous false memories but decreases suggestion-induced false memories in children

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Abstract

We examined the creation of spontaneous and suggestion-induced false memories in maltreated and non-maltreated children. Maltreated and non-maltreated children were involved in a Deese-Roediger-McDermott false memory paradigm where they studied and remembered negative and neutral word lists. Suggestion-induced false memories were created using a misinformation procedure during which both maltreated and non-maltreated children viewed a negative video (i.e., bank robbery) and later received suggestive misinformation concerning the event. Our results showed that maltreated children had higher levels of spontaneous negative false memories but lower levels of suggestion-induced false memories as compared to non-maltreated children. Collectively, our study demonstrates that maltreatment both increases and decreases susceptibility to memory illusions depending on the type of false memory being induced.

    Research areas

  • Maltreatment, False memory, Suggestion, Deese-Roediger-McDermott, Misinformation, Children, TRAUMA-RELATED PSYCHOPATHOLOGY, POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER, TRUE, ILLUSIONS, LISTS, MALLEABILITY, ADOLESCENTS, IMMEDIATE, ADULTS, WORDS
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Details

Original languageEnglish
Article number12177
Pages (from-to)376–391
Number of pages16
JournalBritish Journal of Developmental Psychology
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2017