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Flashbacks, intrusions, mind-wandering - Instances of an involuntary memory spectrum: a commentary on Takarangi, Strange, and Lindsay (2014)

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@article{8da244164f12488ebfe8141760de0fec,
title = "Flashbacks, intrusions, mind-wandering - Instances of an involuntary memory spectrum: a commentary on Takarangi, Strange, and Lindsay (2014)",
abstract = "In their paper, Takarangi, Strange, and Lindsay (2014) showed in two experiments that participants who had witnessed a shocking film frequently {"}mind-wandered without awareness{"} about the content of the film. More importantly, they equated this effect with the occurrence of traumatic intrusions. In this commentary, we argue that the authors adhered to conceptually ambiguous terms, and thereby unintentionally contribute to an already existing conceptual blur in the trauma-memory field. We postulate that clear definitions are urgently needed for phenomena such as intrusions, flashbacks, and mind-wandering, when using them in the context of trauma memory. Furthermore, our proposal is that these phenomena can fall under a spectrum of different involuntary memory instances. We propose that by adopting stricter definitions and viewing them as separate, but interrelated phenomena, different lines of trauma-memory research can be reconciled, which would considerably advance the field. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL MEMORIES, DISSOCIATIONS, EXPERIENCE, INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES, Intrusions, Involuntary autobiographical memories, MECHANISMS, META-CONSCIOUSNESS, Meta-awareness, Mind-wandering, POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER, PTSD, Post-traumatic stress disorder, RESPONSES, TRAUMA, Trauma, Trauma film paradigm",
author = "T. Meyer and H. Otgaar and T. Smeets",
year = "2015",
month = "5",
doi = "10.1016/j.concog.2014.11.012",
language = "English",
volume = "33",
pages = "24--29",
journal = "Consciousness and Cognition",
issn = "1053-8100",
publisher = "Academic Press Inc.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Flashbacks, intrusions, mind-wandering - Instances of an involuntary memory spectrum: a commentary on Takarangi, Strange, and Lindsay (2014)

AU - Meyer, T.

AU - Otgaar, H.

AU - Smeets, T.

PY - 2015/5

Y1 - 2015/5

N2 - In their paper, Takarangi, Strange, and Lindsay (2014) showed in two experiments that participants who had witnessed a shocking film frequently "mind-wandered without awareness" about the content of the film. More importantly, they equated this effect with the occurrence of traumatic intrusions. In this commentary, we argue that the authors adhered to conceptually ambiguous terms, and thereby unintentionally contribute to an already existing conceptual blur in the trauma-memory field. We postulate that clear definitions are urgently needed for phenomena such as intrusions, flashbacks, and mind-wandering, when using them in the context of trauma memory. Furthermore, our proposal is that these phenomena can fall under a spectrum of different involuntary memory instances. We propose that by adopting stricter definitions and viewing them as separate, but interrelated phenomena, different lines of trauma-memory research can be reconciled, which would considerably advance the field. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

AB - In their paper, Takarangi, Strange, and Lindsay (2014) showed in two experiments that participants who had witnessed a shocking film frequently "mind-wandered without awareness" about the content of the film. More importantly, they equated this effect with the occurrence of traumatic intrusions. In this commentary, we argue that the authors adhered to conceptually ambiguous terms, and thereby unintentionally contribute to an already existing conceptual blur in the trauma-memory field. We postulate that clear definitions are urgently needed for phenomena such as intrusions, flashbacks, and mind-wandering, when using them in the context of trauma memory. Furthermore, our proposal is that these phenomena can fall under a spectrum of different involuntary memory instances. We propose that by adopting stricter definitions and viewing them as separate, but interrelated phenomena, different lines of trauma-memory research can be reconciled, which would considerably advance the field. (C) 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

KW - AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL MEMORIES

KW - DISSOCIATIONS

KW - EXPERIENCE

KW - INDIVIDUAL-DIFFERENCES

KW - Intrusions

KW - Involuntary autobiographical memories

KW - MECHANISMS

KW - META-CONSCIOUSNESS

KW - Meta-awareness

KW - Mind-wandering

KW - POSTTRAUMATIC-STRESS-DISORDER

KW - PTSD

KW - Post-traumatic stress disorder

KW - RESPONSES

KW - TRAUMA

KW - Trauma

KW - Trauma film paradigm

U2 - 10.1016/j.concog.2014.11.012

DO - 10.1016/j.concog.2014.11.012

M3 - Article

VL - 33

SP - 24

EP - 29

JO - Consciousness and Cognition

T2 - Consciousness and Cognition

JF - Consciousness and Cognition

SN - 1053-8100

ER -