Research output

Endogenous delta/theta sound-brain phase entrainment accelerates the buildup of auditory streaming

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Standard

Endogenous delta/theta sound-brain phase entrainment accelerates the buildup of auditory streaming. / Riecke, L.; Sack, A.T.; Schroeder, C.E.

In: Current Biology, Vol. 25, No. 24, 21.12.2015, p. 3196-3201.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Author

Bibtex

@article{3f173f7596a9415290ebc27362d15177,
title = "Endogenous delta/theta sound-brain phase entrainment accelerates the buildup of auditory streaming",
abstract = "In many natural listening situations, meaningful sounds (e.g., speech) fluctuate in slow rhythms among other sounds. When a slow rhythmic auditory stream is selectively attended, endogenous delta (14 Hz) oscillations in auditory cortex may shift their timing so that higher-excitability neuronal phases become aligned with salient events in that stream [1, 2]. As a consequence of this stream-brain phase entrainment [3], these events are processed and perceived more readily than temporally non-overlapping events [4-11], essentially enhancing the neural segregation between the attended stream and temporally noncoherent streams [12]. Stream-brain phase entrainment is robust to acoustic interference [13-20] provided that target stream-evoked rhythmic activity can be segregated from noncoherent activity evoked by other sounds [21], a process that usually builds up over time [22-27]. However, it has remained unclear whether stream-brain phase entrainment functionally contributes to this buildup of rhythmic streams or whether it is merely an epiphenomenon of it. Here, we addressed this issue directly by experimentally manipulating endogenous stream-brain phase entrainment in human auditory cortex with non-invasive transcranial alternating current stimulation (TACS) [28-30]. We assessed the consequences of these manipulations on the perceptual buildup of the target stream (the time required to recognize its presence in a noisy background), using behavioral measures in 20 healthy listeners performing a naturalistic listening task. Experimentally induced cyclic 4-Hz variations in stream-brain phase entrainment reliably caused a cyclic 4-Hz pattern in perceptual buildup time. Our findings demonstrate that strong endogenous delta/theta stream-brain phase entrainment accelerates the perceptual emergence of task-relevant rhythmic streams in noisy environments.",
keywords = "ALTERNATING-CURRENT STIMULATION, LOW-FREQUENCY OSCILLATIONS, SELECTIVE ATTENTION, CORTICAL REPRESENTATION, INFORMATIONAL MASKING, PERCEPTUAL AWARENESS, NEURAL OSCILLATIONS, SENSORY SELECTION, CONTINUOUS SPEECH, TONE SEQUENCES",
author = "L. Riecke and A.T. Sack and C.E. Schroeder",
year = "2015",
month = "12",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1016/j.cub.2015.10.045",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "3196--3201",
journal = "Current Biology",
issn = "0960-9822",
publisher = "Cell Press",
number = "24",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Endogenous delta/theta sound-brain phase entrainment accelerates the buildup of auditory streaming

AU - Riecke, L.

AU - Sack, A.T.

AU - Schroeder, C.E.

PY - 2015/12/21

Y1 - 2015/12/21

N2 - In many natural listening situations, meaningful sounds (e.g., speech) fluctuate in slow rhythms among other sounds. When a slow rhythmic auditory stream is selectively attended, endogenous delta (14 Hz) oscillations in auditory cortex may shift their timing so that higher-excitability neuronal phases become aligned with salient events in that stream [1, 2]. As a consequence of this stream-brain phase entrainment [3], these events are processed and perceived more readily than temporally non-overlapping events [4-11], essentially enhancing the neural segregation between the attended stream and temporally noncoherent streams [12]. Stream-brain phase entrainment is robust to acoustic interference [13-20] provided that target stream-evoked rhythmic activity can be segregated from noncoherent activity evoked by other sounds [21], a process that usually builds up over time [22-27]. However, it has remained unclear whether stream-brain phase entrainment functionally contributes to this buildup of rhythmic streams or whether it is merely an epiphenomenon of it. Here, we addressed this issue directly by experimentally manipulating endogenous stream-brain phase entrainment in human auditory cortex with non-invasive transcranial alternating current stimulation (TACS) [28-30]. We assessed the consequences of these manipulations on the perceptual buildup of the target stream (the time required to recognize its presence in a noisy background), using behavioral measures in 20 healthy listeners performing a naturalistic listening task. Experimentally induced cyclic 4-Hz variations in stream-brain phase entrainment reliably caused a cyclic 4-Hz pattern in perceptual buildup time. Our findings demonstrate that strong endogenous delta/theta stream-brain phase entrainment accelerates the perceptual emergence of task-relevant rhythmic streams in noisy environments.

AB - In many natural listening situations, meaningful sounds (e.g., speech) fluctuate in slow rhythms among other sounds. When a slow rhythmic auditory stream is selectively attended, endogenous delta (14 Hz) oscillations in auditory cortex may shift their timing so that higher-excitability neuronal phases become aligned with salient events in that stream [1, 2]. As a consequence of this stream-brain phase entrainment [3], these events are processed and perceived more readily than temporally non-overlapping events [4-11], essentially enhancing the neural segregation between the attended stream and temporally noncoherent streams [12]. Stream-brain phase entrainment is robust to acoustic interference [13-20] provided that target stream-evoked rhythmic activity can be segregated from noncoherent activity evoked by other sounds [21], a process that usually builds up over time [22-27]. However, it has remained unclear whether stream-brain phase entrainment functionally contributes to this buildup of rhythmic streams or whether it is merely an epiphenomenon of it. Here, we addressed this issue directly by experimentally manipulating endogenous stream-brain phase entrainment in human auditory cortex with non-invasive transcranial alternating current stimulation (TACS) [28-30]. We assessed the consequences of these manipulations on the perceptual buildup of the target stream (the time required to recognize its presence in a noisy background), using behavioral measures in 20 healthy listeners performing a naturalistic listening task. Experimentally induced cyclic 4-Hz variations in stream-brain phase entrainment reliably caused a cyclic 4-Hz pattern in perceptual buildup time. Our findings demonstrate that strong endogenous delta/theta stream-brain phase entrainment accelerates the perceptual emergence of task-relevant rhythmic streams in noisy environments.

KW - ALTERNATING-CURRENT STIMULATION

KW - LOW-FREQUENCY OSCILLATIONS

KW - SELECTIVE ATTENTION

KW - CORTICAL REPRESENTATION

KW - INFORMATIONAL MASKING

KW - PERCEPTUAL AWARENESS

KW - NEURAL OSCILLATIONS

KW - SENSORY SELECTION

KW - CONTINUOUS SPEECH

KW - TONE SEQUENCES

U2 - 10.1016/j.cub.2015.10.045

DO - 10.1016/j.cub.2015.10.045

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 3196

EP - 3201

JO - Current Biology

T2 - Current Biology

JF - Current Biology

SN - 0960-9822

IS - 24

ER -