Research output

Effect of self-monitoring through experience sampling on emotion differentiation in depression

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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Effect of self-monitoring through experience sampling on emotion differentiation in depression. / Widdershoven, Raf L.A.; Wichers, Marieke; Kuppens, Peter; Hartmann, Jessica A; Menne-Lothmann, Claudia; Simons, Claudia J P; Bastiaansen, Jojanneke A.

In: Journal of Affective Disorders, Vol. 244, 01.02.2019, p. 71-77.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Harvard

Widdershoven, RLA, Wichers, M, Kuppens, P, Hartmann, JA, Menne-Lothmann, C, Simons, CJP & Bastiaansen, JA 2019, 'Effect of self-monitoring through experience sampling on emotion differentiation in depression', Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 244, pp. 71-77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2018.10.092

APA

Widdershoven, R. L. A., Wichers, M., Kuppens, P., Hartmann, J. A., Menne-Lothmann, C., Simons, C. J. P., & Bastiaansen, J. A. (2019). Effect of self-monitoring through experience sampling on emotion differentiation in depression. Journal of Affective Disorders, 244, 71-77. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2018.10.092

Vancouver

Author

Widdershoven, Raf L.A. ; Wichers, Marieke ; Kuppens, Peter ; Hartmann, Jessica A ; Menne-Lothmann, Claudia ; Simons, Claudia J P ; Bastiaansen, Jojanneke A. / Effect of self-monitoring through experience sampling on emotion differentiation in depression. In: Journal of Affective Disorders. 2019 ; Vol. 244. pp. 71-77.

Bibtex

@article{9faa110ecb5b4a8999c8fa8479bd9371,
title = "Effect of self-monitoring through experience sampling on emotion differentiation in depression",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder has been linked to an inability to differentiate between negative emotions. The current study investigates whether emotion differentiation improves when individuals with major depressive disorder are required to report on specific emotions multiple times a day through the experience sampling method (ESM) - a structured self-report diary technique.METHODS: Seventy-nine patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder participated in this study, of whom 55 used ESM for 6 weeks (3 days a week, 10 times a day). Changes from baseline to post assessment in positive and negative emotion differentiation were compared between the participants who did and those who did not use ESM.RESULTS: Engaging in ESM related to an improvement in both positive and negative emotion differentiation, but only the latter reached statistical significance. The relationship between the number of ESM measurements (dose) and emotion differentiation change (response) was not significant.LIMITATIONS: The sample size for the dose-response analysis was relatively small (N = 55). It is unknown whether emotion differentiation improvements generalize beyond the emotions (N = 12) we probed in this study. Other factors could also have contributed to the change (e.g., meetings with the researchers).CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests that patients with depression using ESM for 3 days a week for 6 weeks can improve their negative emotion differentiation. Future studies should assess after what period of ESM changes in emotion differentiation become apparent, and whether these changes are persistent and relate to actual improvement in depressive symptoms.",
keywords = "DISORDER, Depression, Emotion, Emotion differentiation, Experience sampling, GRANULARITY, HEALTH, PERSONALITY, REFLECTION, RESILIENCE",
author = "Widdershoven, {Raf L.A.} and Marieke Wichers and Peter Kuppens and Hartmann, {Jessica A} and Claudia Menne-Lothmann and Simons, {Claudia J P} and Bastiaansen, {Jojanneke A}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jad.2018.10.092",
language = "English",
volume = "244",
pages = "71--77",
journal = "Journal of Affective Disorders",
issn = "0165-0327",
publisher = "Elsevier Science",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effect of self-monitoring through experience sampling on emotion differentiation in depression

AU - Widdershoven, Raf L.A.

AU - Wichers, Marieke

AU - Kuppens, Peter

AU - Hartmann, Jessica A

AU - Menne-Lothmann, Claudia

AU - Simons, Claudia J P

AU - Bastiaansen, Jojanneke A

N1 - Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

PY - 2019/2/1

Y1 - 2019/2/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder has been linked to an inability to differentiate between negative emotions. The current study investigates whether emotion differentiation improves when individuals with major depressive disorder are required to report on specific emotions multiple times a day through the experience sampling method (ESM) - a structured self-report diary technique.METHODS: Seventy-nine patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder participated in this study, of whom 55 used ESM for 6 weeks (3 days a week, 10 times a day). Changes from baseline to post assessment in positive and negative emotion differentiation were compared between the participants who did and those who did not use ESM.RESULTS: Engaging in ESM related to an improvement in both positive and negative emotion differentiation, but only the latter reached statistical significance. The relationship between the number of ESM measurements (dose) and emotion differentiation change (response) was not significant.LIMITATIONS: The sample size for the dose-response analysis was relatively small (N = 55). It is unknown whether emotion differentiation improvements generalize beyond the emotions (N = 12) we probed in this study. Other factors could also have contributed to the change (e.g., meetings with the researchers).CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests that patients with depression using ESM for 3 days a week for 6 weeks can improve their negative emotion differentiation. Future studies should assess after what period of ESM changes in emotion differentiation become apparent, and whether these changes are persistent and relate to actual improvement in depressive symptoms.

AB - BACKGROUND: Major depressive disorder has been linked to an inability to differentiate between negative emotions. The current study investigates whether emotion differentiation improves when individuals with major depressive disorder are required to report on specific emotions multiple times a day through the experience sampling method (ESM) - a structured self-report diary technique.METHODS: Seventy-nine patients diagnosed with major depressive disorder participated in this study, of whom 55 used ESM for 6 weeks (3 days a week, 10 times a day). Changes from baseline to post assessment in positive and negative emotion differentiation were compared between the participants who did and those who did not use ESM.RESULTS: Engaging in ESM related to an improvement in both positive and negative emotion differentiation, but only the latter reached statistical significance. The relationship between the number of ESM measurements (dose) and emotion differentiation change (response) was not significant.LIMITATIONS: The sample size for the dose-response analysis was relatively small (N = 55). It is unknown whether emotion differentiation improvements generalize beyond the emotions (N = 12) we probed in this study. Other factors could also have contributed to the change (e.g., meetings with the researchers).CONCLUSIONS: The present study suggests that patients with depression using ESM for 3 days a week for 6 weeks can improve their negative emotion differentiation. Future studies should assess after what period of ESM changes in emotion differentiation become apparent, and whether these changes are persistent and relate to actual improvement in depressive symptoms.

KW - DISORDER

KW - Depression

KW - Emotion

KW - Emotion differentiation

KW - Experience sampling

KW - GRANULARITY

KW - HEALTH

KW - PERSONALITY

KW - REFLECTION

KW - RESILIENCE

U2 - 10.1016/j.jad.2018.10.092

DO - 10.1016/j.jad.2018.10.092

M3 - Article

VL - 244

SP - 71

EP - 77

JO - Journal of Affective Disorders

T2 - Journal of Affective Disorders

JF - Journal of Affective Disorders

SN - 0165-0327

ER -