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Classical paintings may trigger pain and pleasure in the gendered brain

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Classical paintings may trigger pain and pleasure in the gendered brain. / de Gelder, Beatrice; Watson, Rebecca; Zhan, Minye; Diano, Matteo; Tamietto, Marco; Vaessen, Maarten J.

In: Cortex, Vol. 109, 12.2018, p. 171-180.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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de Gelder, Beatrice ; Watson, Rebecca ; Zhan, Minye ; Diano, Matteo ; Tamietto, Marco ; Vaessen, Maarten J. / Classical paintings may trigger pain and pleasure in the gendered brain. In: Cortex. 2018 ; Vol. 109. pp. 171-180.

Bibtex

@article{e362773ce04e4155a2dc0bcae0820c15,
title = "Classical paintings may trigger pain and pleasure in the gendered brain",
abstract = "The human body is the most common object of pictorial representation in western art and its representations trigger a vast range of experiences from pain to pleasure. The goal of this study was to investigate brain activity triggered by paintings of male and female body images exemplifying conditions associated with pleasure or pain. Our findings show participant-general as well as gender specific brain activity for either the pain or the pleasure conditions. Although our participants were fully aware that they were viewing artworks, the inferior parietal lobule - known for its role in the perception of emotional body images - and the somatosensory cortex related to touch were selectively active for female body paintings in all participants in the pleasure conditions. As regards gender we observed that the sight of female bodies activated the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex in males, an area known to subserve autonomic arousal. In contrast, in females the sight of the male body activated reward and control related parts of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. This study supports the notion that some basic evolutionary processes operate when we view body images, also when they are cultural heritage paintings far removed from daily experience.",
keywords = "ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX, Aesthetics, Art, Body, COGNITIVE CONTROL, CONFLICT, EMOTION, EMPATHY, Gender, NEURAL MECHANISMS, NEUROBIOLOGY, PERSPECTIVES, Perception, TOUCH, fMRI",
author = "{de Gelder}, Beatrice and Rebecca Watson and Minye Zhan and Matteo Diano and Marco Tamietto and Vaessen, {Maarten J}",
note = "Copyright {\circledC} 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
year = "2018",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1016/j.cortex.2018.09.011",
language = "English",
volume = "109",
pages = "171--180",
journal = "Cortex",
issn = "0010-9452",
publisher = "Elsevier Masson",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Classical paintings may trigger pain and pleasure in the gendered brain

AU - de Gelder, Beatrice

AU - Watson, Rebecca

AU - Zhan, Minye

AU - Diano, Matteo

AU - Tamietto, Marco

AU - Vaessen, Maarten J

N1 - Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

PY - 2018/12

Y1 - 2018/12

N2 - The human body is the most common object of pictorial representation in western art and its representations trigger a vast range of experiences from pain to pleasure. The goal of this study was to investigate brain activity triggered by paintings of male and female body images exemplifying conditions associated with pleasure or pain. Our findings show participant-general as well as gender specific brain activity for either the pain or the pleasure conditions. Although our participants were fully aware that they were viewing artworks, the inferior parietal lobule - known for its role in the perception of emotional body images - and the somatosensory cortex related to touch were selectively active for female body paintings in all participants in the pleasure conditions. As regards gender we observed that the sight of female bodies activated the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex in males, an area known to subserve autonomic arousal. In contrast, in females the sight of the male body activated reward and control related parts of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. This study supports the notion that some basic evolutionary processes operate when we view body images, also when they are cultural heritage paintings far removed from daily experience.

AB - The human body is the most common object of pictorial representation in western art and its representations trigger a vast range of experiences from pain to pleasure. The goal of this study was to investigate brain activity triggered by paintings of male and female body images exemplifying conditions associated with pleasure or pain. Our findings show participant-general as well as gender specific brain activity for either the pain or the pleasure conditions. Although our participants were fully aware that they were viewing artworks, the inferior parietal lobule - known for its role in the perception of emotional body images - and the somatosensory cortex related to touch were selectively active for female body paintings in all participants in the pleasure conditions. As regards gender we observed that the sight of female bodies activated the subgenual anterior cingulate cortex in males, an area known to subserve autonomic arousal. In contrast, in females the sight of the male body activated reward and control related parts of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex. This study supports the notion that some basic evolutionary processes operate when we view body images, also when they are cultural heritage paintings far removed from daily experience.

KW - ANTERIOR CINGULATE CORTEX

KW - Aesthetics

KW - Art

KW - Body

KW - COGNITIVE CONTROL

KW - CONFLICT

KW - EMOTION

KW - EMPATHY

KW - Gender

KW - NEURAL MECHANISMS

KW - NEUROBIOLOGY

KW - PERSPECTIVES

KW - Perception

KW - TOUCH

KW - fMRI

U2 - 10.1016/j.cortex.2018.09.011

DO - 10.1016/j.cortex.2018.09.011

M3 - Article

VL - 109

SP - 171

EP - 180

JO - Cortex

T2 - Cortex

JF - Cortex

SN - 0010-9452

ER -