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Agenda-setting in the Common Security and Defence Policy: An Institutionalist Perspective

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Abstract

The European Union (EU) has launched an impressive number of crisis management missions since its Common Security and Defence Policy became operational in 2003. This article analyses the agenda-setting phase of these civilian and military operations in order to explain why the EU has sent troops, policemen, judges, prosecutors and monitors across three continents. It presents an institutionalist perspective and argues that the former High Representative Javier Solana and his officials have been instrumental in putting various operations on the agenda. They have employed deliberate agenda-setting strategies, such as venue shopping, conflict expansion and issue framing, to further their bureaucratic interest of launching new missions. Solana and his officials had the ability to affect the agenda-setting process thanks to their pivotal position in policy making. This gave them with superior information on the state of play and an early mover advantage as well as strong international networks. The article provides empirical evidence from the crisis management missions in Aceh, Bosnia, Chad and Kosovo. It concludes with the changes to the Common Security and Defence Policy after the Treaty of Lisbon.

    Research areas

  • COUNCIL SECRETARIAT, CSDP, DYNAMICS, EU, EUROPEAN SECURITY, European Union, Javier Solana, MILITARY OPERATION, POLITICS, POWER, UNION, agenda-setting, institutionalism

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Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)454-472
Number of pages19
JournalCooperation and Conflict
Volume47
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2012