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Adaptive memory: identifying the proximate roots of the survival processing advantage

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Adaptive memory: identifying the proximate roots of the survival processing advantage. / Otgaar, H.; Jelicic, M.; Smeets, T.

In: Journal of Psychology, Vol. 149, No. 4, 01.01.2015, p. 339-355.

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@article{c56c58ae46b04774aa8a6718995f5697,
title = "Adaptive memory: identifying the proximate roots of the survival processing advantage",
abstract = "The current study examined the role of item-specific, relational, and elaborative processing on adaptive memory. Younger and older adults received the standard survival processing, a survival-short, or a pleasantness processing instruction. The survival-short condition was specifically included to lead to fewer possibilities to engage in elaborative processing. Furthermore, half of the presented words were categorized words to boost relational processing. Younger adults demonstrated the typical survival recall advantage in that standard survival processing instructions resulted in superior free recall performance than that of the survival-short and the pleasantness processing groups. Among older adults, no mnemonic benefit of standard survival processing relative to the survival-short or pleasantness processing groups was found. Furthermore, reducing the probability of elaborative processing (i.e., through the survival-short processing instructions) abolished the survival recall advantage. Our results thus provide further evidence for the role of item-specific, relational, and elaborative processing in the survival processing advantage.",
author = "H. Otgaar and M. Jelicic and T. Smeets",
year = "2015",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/00223980.2013.879848",
language = "English",
volume = "149",
pages = "339--355",
journal = "Journal of Psychology",
issn = "0022-3980",
publisher = "Routledge/Taylor & Francis Group",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Adaptive memory: identifying the proximate roots of the survival processing advantage

AU - Otgaar, H.

AU - Jelicic, M.

AU - Smeets, T.

PY - 2015/1/1

Y1 - 2015/1/1

N2 - The current study examined the role of item-specific, relational, and elaborative processing on adaptive memory. Younger and older adults received the standard survival processing, a survival-short, or a pleasantness processing instruction. The survival-short condition was specifically included to lead to fewer possibilities to engage in elaborative processing. Furthermore, half of the presented words were categorized words to boost relational processing. Younger adults demonstrated the typical survival recall advantage in that standard survival processing instructions resulted in superior free recall performance than that of the survival-short and the pleasantness processing groups. Among older adults, no mnemonic benefit of standard survival processing relative to the survival-short or pleasantness processing groups was found. Furthermore, reducing the probability of elaborative processing (i.e., through the survival-short processing instructions) abolished the survival recall advantage. Our results thus provide further evidence for the role of item-specific, relational, and elaborative processing in the survival processing advantage.

AB - The current study examined the role of item-specific, relational, and elaborative processing on adaptive memory. Younger and older adults received the standard survival processing, a survival-short, or a pleasantness processing instruction. The survival-short condition was specifically included to lead to fewer possibilities to engage in elaborative processing. Furthermore, half of the presented words were categorized words to boost relational processing. Younger adults demonstrated the typical survival recall advantage in that standard survival processing instructions resulted in superior free recall performance than that of the survival-short and the pleasantness processing groups. Among older adults, no mnemonic benefit of standard survival processing relative to the survival-short or pleasantness processing groups was found. Furthermore, reducing the probability of elaborative processing (i.e., through the survival-short processing instructions) abolished the survival recall advantage. Our results thus provide further evidence for the role of item-specific, relational, and elaborative processing in the survival processing advantage.

U2 - 10.1080/00223980.2013.879848

DO - 10.1080/00223980.2013.879848

M3 - Article

VL - 149

SP - 339

EP - 355

JO - Journal of Psychology

T2 - Journal of Psychology

JF - Journal of Psychology

SN - 0022-3980

IS - 4

ER -