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Acute versus repeated chocolate exposure: effects on intake and cravings in restrained and unrestrained eaters

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Abstract

The cue-reactivity model, which is based on conditioning processes, posits that repeated food exposure (in the absence of consumption) should decrease cue reactivity. To examine whether repeated chocolate exposure attenuates cravings and intake, relative to those exposed to an acute cue, a 2 (repeated vs acute cue) x 2 (restrained vs unrestrained eaters) design was employed. Fifty female participants were recruited. Repeated exposure reduced cravings in unrestrained eaters (relative to acute exposure), but increased cravings in restrained eaters. An interaction between restraint and exposure emerged on intake, such that restrained eaters ate less after acute exposure than did unrestrained eaters.

    Research areas

  • cue exposure, food intake, dietary restraint, food cravings, cue reactivity, FOOD-CUE EXPOSURE, BULIMIA-NERVOSA, ANTICIPATORY SALIVATION, EATING BEHAVIOR, SELF-CONTROL, EXTINCTION, TEMPTATION, REACTIVITY, THERAPY, WOMEN
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Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)482-490
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume19
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014