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A world of difference: the sources of regional government composition and alternation

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Abstract

This article aims to explain longitudinal and cross-sectional variation in regional government composition - oversized majorities and incongruence between regional and national governments (cross-cutting) - and regional government alternation. The analysis focuses on the explanatory value of a wide range of regional-level institutional variables, such as majoritarian vs. proportional voting systems and established practices of consociationalism. In addition, it provides a tentative exploration of the impact of regional (i.e. non-state-wide) parties on government composition and alternation. The findings show that most institutional variables have the expected impact, e.g., majoritarian voting systems increase government alternation and consensual practices decrease both cross-cutting and alternation. The analysis also suggests that regional parties impact on government composition and alternation in two ways. Strong regional parties increase cross-cutting and, once in office, they tend to reduce alternation. Smaller regional parties out of office tend to increase alternation and to decrease oversized government as their seat shares grow.

    Research areas

  • Regional government, regional executive, regional parties, regional elections, CONSOCIATIONAL DEMOCRACY, MULTILEVEL SETTINGS, PARTIES, COMPETITION, COALITIONS, SPAIN, CORPORATISM, CONGRUENCE, STRATEGIES, COUNTRIES
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Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)703-727
Number of pages25
JournalWest European Politics
Volume41
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018