Which approach to measure cognitive functioning should be preferred when exploring the association between cognitive functioning and participation after stroke?

J A de Graaf*, B Nijsse, V P M Schepers, C.M. van Heugten, M.W.M. Post, J M A Visser-Meily

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

3 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

A variety of approaches are currently used to explore the relationship between cognitive functioning and participation after stroke. We aimed to gain insight into the preferred approach to measure cognitive functioning when exploring the association between cognitive functioning and participation in the long term after stroke. In this inception cohort study 128 individuals with stroke participated and were assessed at a single time point three to four years after the event. Participation was measured using the Restrictions subscale of the Utrecht Scale for Evaluation of Rehabilitation-Participation. Subjective cognitive complaints were assessed using the Cognition subscale of the Checklist for Cognitive and Emotional Consequences (CLCE-24-C). Objective cognitive performance was measured using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) and a neuropsychological test battery (NTB) testing multiple cognitive domains. Participation showed a strong correlation (r = 0.51) with the CLCE-24-C and moderate correlations with the domains of visuospatial perception (r = 0.37) and mental speed (r = 0.36). Backward linear regression analyses showed that participation restrictions were best explained by the combination of the CLCE-24-C and a test for visuospatial perception (R2 = 0.31). Our findings suggest the use of a combination of subjective cognitive complaints and objective cognitive performance to explore the relationship between cognitive functioning and participation after stroke.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1207-1223
Number of pages17
JournalNeuropsychological Rehabilitation
Volume31
Issue number8
Early online date4 Jun 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Sep 2021

Keywords

  • Stroke
  • social participation
  • community participation
  • cognition
  • cognitive symptoms
  • QUALITY-OF-LIFE
  • OLDER-ADULTS
  • COMPLAINTS
  • DEFICITS
  • IMPAIRMENT
  • PHASE
  • MOCA
  • RESPONSIVENESS
  • PREDICTORS
  • CARE

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