When faking emotions is especially hurtful: the role of punishment sensitivity

B.H.J. Schreurs, H. Günter, U.R. Hülsheger, I.H. van Emmerik

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstractAcademic

Abstract

Based on a social functional account of emotion, this study investigated the possibility that surface acting is more harmful to individuals who are afraid of social disapproval. Using daily diary data collected from 275 Dutch service workers over ten working days, we examined whether punishment sensitivity, as a measure for fear of social disapproval, moderates the within-person relationship between daily surface acting and daily job-related well-being (i.e., emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and work engagement). Consistent with predictions, the results of multilevel analyses showed that surface acting is particularly harmful for punishment-sensitive employees. We discuss scholarly and practical implications of this finding.
Original languageEnglish
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2013
Event73rd Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Orlando -
Duration: 9 Aug 201313 Aug 2013

Conference

Conference73rd Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Orlando
Period9/08/1313/08/13

Cite this

Schreurs, B. H. J., Günter, H., Hülsheger, U. R., & van Emmerik, I. H. (2013). When faking emotions is especially hurtful: the role of punishment sensitivity. Abstract from 73rd Academy of Management Annual Meeting, Orlando, . https://doi.org/10.5465/AMBPP.2013.11879abstract