What is the most accurate whole-body imaging modality for assessment of local and distant recurrent disease in colorectal cancer? A meta-analysis

M. Maas, I.J.G. Rutten, P.J. Nelemans, D.M.J. Lambregts, V.C. Cappendijk, G.L. Beets, R.G.H. Beets-Tan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of positron emission tomography (PET), PET/CT, CT and MRI as whole-body imaging modalities for the detection of local and/or distant recurrent disease in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients who have a (high) suspicion of recurrent disease, based on clinical findings or rise in carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA).

A meta-analysis was undertaken. PubMed and Embase were searched for studies on the accuracy of whole-body imaging for patients with suspected local and/or distant recurrence of their CRC. Additionally, studies had to have included at least 20 patients with CRC and 2 x 2 contingency tables had to be provided or derivable. Articles evaluating only local recurrence or liver metastasis were excluded. Summary receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed from the data on sensitivity and specificity of individual studies and pooled estimates of diagnostic odds ratios (DORs) and areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) were calculated. To test for heterogeneity the Cochran Q test was used.

Fourteen observational studies were included which evaluated PET, PET/CT, CT and/or MRI. Study results were available in 12 studies for PET, in 5 studies for CT, in 5 studies for PET/CT and in 1 study for MRI. AUCs for PET, PET/CT and CT were 0.94 (0.90-0.97), 0.94 (0.87-0.98) and 0.83 (0.72-0.90), respectively. In patient based analyses PET/CT had a higher diagnostic performance than PET with an AUC of 0.95 (0.89-0.97) for PET/CT vs 0.92 (0.86-0.96) for PET.

Both whole-body PET and PET/CT are very accurate for the detection of local and/or distant recurrent disease in CRC patients with a (high) suspicion of recurrent disease. CT has the lowest diagnostic performance. This difference is probably mainly due to the lower accuracy of CT for detection of extrahepatic metastases (including local recurrence). For clinical practice PET/CT might be the modality of choice when evaluating patients with a (high) suspicion of recurrent disease, because of its best performance in patient based analyses and confident prediction of disease status.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1560-1571
Number of pages12
JournalEuropean Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging
Volume38
Issue number8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2011

Keywords

  • Colorectal cancer
  • Whole-body imaging
  • Recurrence
  • Staging
  • POSITRON-EMISSION-TOMOGRAPHY
  • LYMPH-NODE METASTASES
  • FDG-PET SCAN
  • LIVER METASTASES
  • RECTAL-CANCER
  • F-18-FDG PET
  • COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY
  • EXTRAHEPATIC-DISEASE
  • INTEGRATED PET/CT
  • DECISION-MAKING

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