Vitamin D3 supplementation in multiple sclerosis: Symptoms and biomarkers of depression

Linda Rolf*, Anne-Hilde Muris, Yvonne Bol, Jan Damoiseaux, Joost Smolders, Raymond Hupperts

*Corresponding author for this work

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Abstract

Depressive symptoms are common in multiple sclerosis (MS), and both depression and MS have been associated with a poor vitamin D status. As cytokine-mediated inflammatory processes play a role in the pathogenesis of both disorders, we hypothesized that vitamin D-3 supplementation reduces depressive symptoms in MS via its immunomodulatory properties. In this randomized pilot study relapsing remitting (RR) MS patients received either vitamin D-3 supplementation (n = 20; 14.000 IU/day) or placebo (n = 20) during 48 weeks. Pre- and post-supplementation depression scores, measured using the Hospital Anxiety Depression Scale (HADS) depression subscale (HADS-D), showed a significant decrease within the vitamin D-3 group (median HADS-D 4.0 to 3.0, p = 0.02), a trend towards a decrease within the placebo group (median HADS-D 3.0 to 2.0, p = 0.06), but no significantly different reductions between groups (p = 0.78). Furthermore, no reductions in pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine balances, secreted by stimulated leukocytes and CD8(+) T cells, were found in the vitamin D-3 compared to the placebo arm. Therefore, we found no evidence for a reduction of depressive symptoms or related biomarkers upon vitamin D-3 supplementation in RRMS patients in this exploratory study. Whether vitamin D-3 supplementation is of benefit in manifest depression in MS needs to be assessed by additional studies. (C) 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)30-35
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of the Neurological Sciences
Volume378
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jul 2017

Keywords

  • Depressive symptoms
  • Multiple sclerosis
  • Supplementation
  • Vitamin D
  • RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED-TRIALS
  • MAJOR DEPRESSION
  • FATIGUE
  • METAANALYSIS
  • DISORDERS
  • HYPOTHESIS
  • CYTOKINES
  • ANXIETY
  • SCALE
  • MOOD

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