Utilisation of sexual and reproductive health services among street children and young adults in Kampala, Uganda: does migration matter?

M.F. Bwambale*, P. Bukuluki, C.A. Moyer, B.H.W. Van den Borne

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

1 Citation (Web of Science)

Abstract

BackgroundWhile the nexus of migration and health outcomes is well acknowledged, the effect of rural-urban migration on the use of sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services has received less attention. We assessed the effect of rural-urban migration on the use of SRH services, while controlling for confounding, and whether there is a difference in the use of SRH services among migrant and non-migrant street children and young adults.MethodsData were collected from 513 street children and young adults aged 12-24years, using venue-based time-space sampling (VBTS). We performed multivariate logistic regression analysis using Stata 16.0 to identify factors associated with SRH services use, with rural-urban migration status as the main predictor. Participants were further classified as new migrants (<= 2years of stay in city), established migrants (>2years of stay in city) or non-migrants (lifelong native street children) with no rural-urban migration history.ResultsOverall, 18.13% of the street children and young adults had used contraception/family planning, 58.67% had tested for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and knew their status and 34.70% had been screened for sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Non-migrants were 2.70 times more likely to use SRH services (HIV testing, STI screening and family planning) compared to the migrants (aOR=2.70, 95% CI 1.23-5.97). Other factors associated with SRH services use among street children and young adults include age (aOR=4.70, 95% CI 2.87-7.68), schooling status (aOR=0.33, 95% CI 0.15-0.76), knowledge of place of care (aOR=2.71, 95% CI 1.64-4.46) and access to SRH information (aOR=3.23, 95% CI 2.00-5.24).ConclusionsSRH services utilisation among migrant street children and young adults is low compared to their non-migrant counterparts and is independently associated with migration status, age, schooling status, knowledge of place of care and access to SRH information. Our findings call for the need to design and implement multi-dimensional interventions to increase the use of SRH services among street children and young adults, while taking into consideration their migration patterns.
Original languageEnglish
Article number169
Number of pages9
JournalBMC Health Services Research
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • Rural-urban migration
  • Street children and young adults
  • Sexual and reproductive health services
  • Uganda

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