Using intervention mapping for the development of a targeted secure web-based outreach strategy named SafeFriend, for Chlamydia trachomatis testing in young people at risk

K.A.T.M. Theunissen, C.J. Hoebe, R. Crutzen, C. Kara-Zaitri, N.K. de Vries, J.E. van Bergen, M.A. van der Sande, N.H. Dukers-Muijrers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Many young people at high risk for Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct) are not reached by current sexual health care systems, such as general practitioners and public sexual health care centres (sexually transmitted infection clinics).Ct is the most frequently diagnosed bacterial sexually transmitted infection (STI) among sexually active people and in particular young heterosexuals. Innovative screening strategies are needed to interrupt the transmission of Ct among young people and connect the hidden cases to care. METHODS: Intervention Mapping (IM), a systematic approach to develop theory- and evidence-based interventions, was used to develop a strategy to target Ct testing towards young people who are currently hidden to care in The Netherlands. Both clinical users (i.e. sexual health care nurses) and public users (i.e., young people at risk for Ct) were closely involved in the IM process. A needs assessment study was carried out using semi-structured interviews among users (N = 21), a literature search and by taking lessons learned from existing screening programmes. Theoretical methods and practical applications to reach high risk young people and influence testing were selected and translated into specific programme components. RESULTS: The IM approach resulted in the development of a secure and web-based outreach Ct screening strategy, named SafeFriend. It is developed to target groups of high-risk young people who are currently hidden to care. Key methods include web-based Respondent Driven Sampling, starting from young Ct positive sexual health care centre clients, to reach and motivate peers (i.e., sex partners and friends) to get tested for Ct. Testing and the motivation of peers were proposed as the desired behavioural outcomes and the Precaution Adoption Process Model was chosen as theoretical framework. End users, i.e., young people and sexual health care nurses were interviewed and included in the development process to increase the success of implementation. CONCLUSIONS: IM proved useful to develop an intervention for targeted Ct testing among young people. We believe this to be the first web-based outreach screening strategy which combines chain referral sampling with the delivery of targeted Ct testing to high risk young people within their sexual and social networks.
Original languageEnglish
Article number996
JournalBMC Public Health
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2013

Cite this