Two field studies on the effects of alcohol on eyewitness identification, confidence, and decision times

Melanie Sauerland*, Nick J. Broers, Kim van Oorsouw

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

6 Citations (Web of Science)

Abstract

In two field studies, bar tenants (Ns=86 and 190, respectively) were successively approached by confederates C1 and C2 on a night out. Confederate C3 then presented participants with a six-person target-absent or target-present lineup concerning C1 or C2 (immediate test). Several days later, participants viewed a lineup regarding the confederate they had not attempted to identify earlier (C1/C2; delayed test). An immediate compared with a delayed, sober identification test did not increase the risk of a false identification decision. A blood alcohol concentration of 0.06-0.07% best discriminated accurate from inaccurate decisions. Choosers with a blood alcohol concentration

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)370-385
Number of pages16
JournalApplied Cognitive Psychology
Volume33
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2019

Keywords

  • alcohol myopia
  • confidence-accuracy relationship
  • latency
  • optimality hypothesis
  • optimum alcohol boundary
  • INTOXICATED WITNESSES
  • ACCURACY RELATIONSHIP
  • WORKING-MEMORY
  • ROC ANALYSIS
  • METAANALYSIS
  • POSTDICTORS
  • SUSPECTS
  • AROUSAL

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